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Table of Contents

Feb 2007

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Cover Story


Flying monkeys and the glowing face of a 21st century wizard enliven the stage at Effingham High School in Illinois during a student production of The Wizard of Oz thanks to laptops, software and DVDs.

The 1999 shootings at Columbine High got administrators thinking about it.

The tragedy of 9/11 made many sign up for it.

And the recent spate of school-related shootings last fall has

confirmed for others that an emergency notification system is not an extra, but a necessity.

In the Metropolitan School District of Wayne Township, a suburb of Indianapolis, Ind., 97 percent of first- and second-graders gained at least one instructional reading level, 82 percent rose two levels or higher, and 34 percent rose three levels or more in the 2005-2006 year.


Math and science, oh my. What will we do? We don't produce enough students interested in math and science. Something must be done. I hear this refrain so often my head hurts.


Many districts have discovered that VoIP can help lighten long distance budgets, but Charles County Schools is finding there's more to the technology than just saving money.

According to the 2005 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), average sci-ence scores compared to 2006, have made slow progress at Grade 4, come to a standstill at Grade 8, and lost ground at Grade 12.

Problem: Enrollment of female students in Colorado Springs School District 11 middle school career and technical education exploratory classes was low, which meant few females enrolled in those electives at the high school level.


Supreme Court Reviews Race in Assigning Schools