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Table of Contents

Jul 2008

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Cover Story

Features

Handheld computers can leverage the power of technology to enable all students to succeed, including children with special education needs. They are cheaper than laptops, are more portable, and have more memory and power capabilities than handhelds possessed just five years ago.


Solutions

Certain things are easier to accomplish in a district comprised of only 700 students.


"Here I know most of the kids quite well," says Mary Rubadeau, the nine-year superintendent of the Telluride (Colo.) School District. Known for attending class and student council meetings, luncheons held by extracurricular clubs so she can be a sounding board, and most sporting activities, Rubadeau says, "It's not a usual superintendent relationship. I think they value knowing their superintendent. I have an open door, too, so they always know they can come to ask my opinion."


Educators may sometimes feel they are in a race against several clocks-the class period, the school day, the semester, the academic year, high school exit exams and so forth-as they prepare students for academic success. What can district leaders do to appropriately address issues of time and time management? How can they ensure that what is most important-student learning-is not at the mercy of things that are less urgent? As leaders weigh their options, research offers some important reminders.


All Time Is Not Created Equal


Briefings







 

Report Slams Reading First, But Others Defend It


Departments







 

Notification System Needs Recognition








 

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