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Art/Music

From DA

State of the States: Arts as education

Alison DeNisco
May, 2016
27 states identify the arts as a core academic subject and 49 states have adopted elementary and secondary standards for the arts. (Click to enlarge)

The arts survive in American education, despite pressures placed on school leaders to focus on high-stakes tests in math and English: 27 states identify the arts as a core academic subject and 49 states have adopted elementary and secondary standards for the arts.

Progressive schools stretch STEAM

Lauren Barack
March, 2016
Speakers at upcoming conferences (clockwise from top left): Rochelle Gutierrez will speak at NCTM about the next generation mathematics for all; Lisa Nyberg will speak at NSTA about giving students more ownership of their education; Deborah Gaston and  Andrea Kantrowitz will speak at NAEA about adding arts to the sciences.

At three annual conferences this spring—the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), the National Art Education Association (NAEA) and the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)—experts and educators will offer guidance in developing STEAM instruction across a range a subjects and projects.

New classroom tools aid STEAM lessons

Ray Bendici
March, 2016
Dremel Dreams is an educational program that introduces 3D printing to the classroom.

With the ever-increasing reach of technology and the corresponding growth of STEAM-related curricula, it is challenging to find the right tools to help bring such concepts into the classroom in engaging, student-friendly ways. STEAM-focused classroom products also must easily integrate into existing lesson plans.

School leader paves a more promising path

Matt Zalaznick
February, 2016
Clayton County Public Schools Superintendent Luvenia Jackson, left, and Principal Michael Robinson speak to two students at the district’s newly opened Martha Ellen Stillwell School of the Arts.

Luvenia Jackson knows students can’t learn when they’re in jail. During 40 years in education, the Clayton County Public Schools superintendent has seen that academic performance cannot improve systemwide under zero-tolerance discipline.

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