In The News

BYOT: Is it the great equalizer or causing a wider divide?

Since 23 percent of American teens have tablet computers, 47 percent have smartphones, and 78 percent have cellphones, a bring your own device policy is on the rise, according to the Pew Research Center. But will students who can't afford the technology be left behind?

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Will technology mark the end to cursive writing?

The Common Core State Standards do not require students to learn cursive. Only 11 of the 50 states have amended their education requirements to mandate cursive be included in the curriculum. As a result, states and districts nationwide are grappling with whether to teach the skill at all.

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Long Island schools step up use of tablets

Some districts in Long Island, N.Y., are finally taking the technology plunge after dipping their toe in the water for several years. Mineola, which started with 100 iPads in 2010, is now providing one iPad for each of its 1,200 students in third through eighth grades, while Bethpage is distributing Google Chromebooks to middle schoolers.

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Digital education shouldn’t bypass the disabled

Students returning to school will find a plethora of new technologies and virtual programs on which their institutions have been spending millions of dollars. Yet even as these new technology-rich environments revolutionize the classroom, few have made provisions for people who are blind, dyslexic, or otherwise print-disabled.

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Sesame Street widens its focus to include STEM

Simple ABCs and 123s? So old school. In the last four years, “Sesame Street” has set itself a much larger goal: teaching nature, math, science and engineering concepts and problem-solving to a preschool audience—with topics like how a pulley works or how to go about investigating what’s making Mr. Snuffleupagus sneeze.

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Parents' top 12 back-to-school tech questions

This year, the back-to-school season will bring more technology—both in and out of the classroom—than ever before. Navigating this territory will be challenging, exciting and puzzling. Here are some of the top concerns CIOs might hear from parents trying to figure it all out.

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High school student builds $3M global tech company

Jaylen Bledsoe is a 15-year-old sophomore at Hazelwood West High School (St. Louis) who started his own tech company that is now worth $3.5 million. Here, Bledsoe explains how he started building the company when he was only 12.

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Isle of Wight students face new tech restrictions this year

This year, students at Isle of Wight schools in Virginia are finding that their access to games, social media, and instant messaging is more restricted, while teachers are getting more training on how to use digital technology in class.

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Increased bandwidth supports schools’ digital learning transformation

A Moore County Schools’ official called a recent upgrade to the North Carolina district's digital network system a "major boost" that will increase bandwidth "tenfold." Installed by fiber optic company BroadPlex, the district is receiving 10 times the bandwidth at a lower cost than it was previously paying.

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Carteret County, N.C., launches state technology support system

As a new school year begins, so does a new state technology support system for students, teachers, and parents. The $26 million Home Base system is one of two major technology initiatives taking place in 2013-2014.

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