In The News

School librarian cutbacks widen digital divide

About one-third of public schools do not have a full-time, state-certified librarian. The librarian’s ability to teach all students digital literacy skills plays a large role in closing the digital divide between students with internet at home and those who don’t have access.

Rolling out blended learning

Blended and online learning platforms are changing K12 pedagogy by providing students with some control over their path, time, pace and place of learning. This sharp departure from the traditional factory-based model of teaching and learning is increasing student engagement and freeing up time so that teachers can provide more one-on-one instruction.

‘Cyberarts’: Technology pushes art education forward

Art programs in schools are usually the first to be cut in times of budgetary constraints, but technological innovations have presented creative students with opportunities dubbed “cyberarts.” Cyberart can make students more computer literate as well as spark their imaginations.

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Massachusetts school board approves $6 million technology plan

The Springfield City School District board has approved a $6 million technology plan. The plan calls for the addition of laptops for every high school student in 2016 and for students in grades four through six in 2017.

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Maryland students build green technology house

Tiny House is hi-tech, hyper-efficient and very small. As part of a broader sustainability education experience, students at the Key School in Annapolis have been working on the house to demonstrate the latest sustainable building materials and green technology, including solar electricity, rainwater filtration and innovative design to maximize space and efficiency.

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High-tech helmets pilot approved for Arkansas football team

Helmet maker Riddell approached North Little Rock High's football team about trying a new helmet sensor that can alert trainers when athletes may have sustained a concussion. It's a brand new technology that only a handful of schools around the country are using.

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Putting teachers at the center of education technology

MIT Blossoms, one of the most exciting and effective uses of educational technology to help high school students learn math and science, doesn’t boast the latest in artificial intelligence or adaptive algorithms. Its secret weapon is, rather, a canny understanding of human psychology—both students’ and teachers’.

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The e-textbook transformation

A new wave of e-textbooks is giving students more than just words and a few hotlinks on a digital page. Publishers over the last few years have been adding video, interactive maps and gamified quizzes designed to engage students more deeply in their learning.

Smart energy technology saves money

With new, smarter building technology to control energy use, school leaders can reduce their carbon footprint and use the money saved to fund projects that may have suffered from budget cuts. U.S. schools spend more on energy than they do “on computers and textbooks combined,” according to a past report by Energy Star.

Georgia school board and tech college renew agreement

Dawson County's Board of Education has renewed its dual enrollment program contract with Lanier Technical College. The program allows students to take courses from a state public or private college while enrolled in high school and receive credit at both levels.

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