Opinion & Analysis

Daily news

Lawmakers pretend poverty doesn’t affect schools

Better jobs, better wages, better infrastructure, early childhood education, more resources for the most burdened schools, universal access to health care. Those things alleviate poverty. And that, in turn, gives schools a fighting chance.

Read more

Matthew Zalaznick's picture

Is standardized testing a civil-rights issue?

Advocacy groups worry that if states are given more flexibility around testing, at-risk students will slip through cracks.

Read more

Matthew Zalaznick's picture

Study looks at aftermath of Chicago school closings in 2013

About two-thirds of the 12,000 displaced students who re-enrolled in the district chose to enroll at the school designated for them by the district. But the majority of students who enrolled in schools other than their assigned replacement wound up in lower-performing schools.

Read more

Matthew Zalaznick's picture

Education storms onto national radar in 2015, but not innovation

Activity around renewing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act has reached a fevered pitch and President Obama further elevated education to the national agenda with a focus on making community colleges free and protecting student privacy.

Read more

Matthew Zalaznick's picture

Latino education gains are encouraging

The report, "The Condition of Latinos in Education: 2015 Factbook," released by Excelencia in Education, paints a more accurate profile of Latino students, one spotlighting achievement and countering misperceptions and myths.

Read more

California’s public schools are failing English learners

The new California funding formula can be read to encourage school districts to keep students classified as English learners longer than necessary to receive more money. The state should remove this incentive by altering the formula to allow districts to continue to receive grants for students at least two years after they are reclassified.

Read more

Make Wyoming's school chief an expert, not a politician

The state constitution only requires a person running for state superintendent be at least age 25, a U.S. citizen and a qualified elector. Perhaps when the state was in its infancy, those qualifications were enough. But we need to require more qualifications by appointing, rather than electing, a superintendent of public instruction.

Read more

Half of Kentucky's kindergartners not ready for school

Half of the state's kindergartners started this school year lacking basic skills they need to be ready to succeed in school, according to the results of a statewide readiness test. The findings statewide and in local school districts showed that not much has changed since last year's results.

Read more

The guidance counselor crisis

How might schools better equip students with a shortage of guidance counselors? One solution is to bring in mentors who take pressure off the overwhelmed guidance counselors. Retirees are one great source of talent — they have the experience, time and wisdom.

Read more

How can your librarian help bolster brain-based teaching practices?

Transitioning back to an inquiry-based approach to instruction requires students to take a more active role and asks teachers to step back into a supportive position. It can be a tough transition for many students and their teachers, but turning to the school librarian for support could make the transition a little easier.

Read more

Pages