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A city, a school and a lot of moms

The debate over how best to improve urban school systems in major American cities is robust and complicated. But one Boston community found a way to transform public education almost by accident. For the Charlestown neighborhood, a group of new moms just looking for a night out ended up blossoming into a determined movement for schools.

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Can traditional schools learn to play well with charters?

After decades of adhering to a top-down bureaucratic paradigm, New Jersey is one of many states that is starting to develop a diversified model of education delivery. Instead of a one-size-fits-all system, we’re evolving toward a portfolio of options for students that includes both traditional schools and independent public charters.

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All Los Angeles schools should have good teachers

The issue of who gets laid off at low-income schools goes to the heart of whether the students with the greatest needs, because of poverty and language barriers, will be taught by excellent teachers.

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Do students still have free speech in school?

Social media has eroded young people's privacy—and advocates are trying to win it back.

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Banning shock weapons in schools

Complaints about dangerous disciplinary practices involving shock weapons are cropping up all over the country. Many districts need to overhaul practices that criminalize too many young people. In the meantime, officials need to ban these weapons in schools.

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In school rampages, the weapon matters

Last week's tragedy can't help but invoke memories of the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. The difference today is that, because the Murrysville, Pa., perpetrator chose to use knives, victims' families can look forward to a future with their loved ones—instead of planning their funerals.

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Young teachers stick around, bringing tech savvy

In 2007, about 200,000 teachers started in the education workforce, one of the largest groups of beginners to join public schools in a single year. New research shows many of them remain teachers, despite one of the most tumultuous periods in U.S. education.

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When equalization of Illinois funding results in inequity

Three fundamental flaws in the General State Aid formula have contributed to historic levels of funding inequality: The complexity of the formula, the continual flow of state funding to districts regardless of how much is spent locally per pupil, and the failure to account for extraordinary costs associated with students with special needs.

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Drawing the disciplinary line with "use" of imaginary weapons in schools

School suspensions over things that could not possibly be guns have been going on for years. School violence is indeed a real threat. In regard to punishments, school officials here are exercising discretion without oversight, and their snap decisions on imaginary weapons are affecting real futures.

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Start effective sex education before college

Sex education designed to intimidate students into complying with a set of rules and morals is destined to fail. An honest, informative approach to sex education needs to be instituted at an earlier age in order to adequately prepare young people to make informed decisions in college.

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