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Lauren Williams's picture

Cursives handwriting helps make us unique

It is reported that Michael Hairston, in 2010 president of the Fairfax Education Association, called cursive “a dying art.” He also said, “Cursive writing is a traditional skill that has been replaced with technology.” Other anti-cursive educators refer to cursive as “obsolete.”

Lauren Williams's picture

Kentucky's new science education standards trigger heated debate

Nearly two dozen parents, teachers, scientists and advocacy groups commented at the state Department of Education hearing on the Next Generation Science Standards. The broad set of guidelines will revamp content in grades K-12 and help meet requirements from a 2009 law that called for improving education.

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New St. Louis schools collaboration offers hope for transfer discussion

Just sit back and watch as the St. Louis Public Schools and KIPP charter schools combine forces to show the St. Louis region the educational wave of the future.

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The Chicago schools budget crisis is here

The CPS money crisis is here and — despite district officials' hopes and vows — it will hit students and classrooms.

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Matthew Zalaznick's picture

Law on racial diversity stirs Greenwich (Conn.) schools

Just a few minutes’ drive from the polo fields, the fieldstone walls guarding 10-acre estates and the Greenwich Country Day School, from which the elder George Bush graduated in 1937, is far denser terrain, where the homes are smaller and closer together and part of a public housing complex that seems escaped from New York City.

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Matthew Zalaznick's picture

Euphoria is over for Chicago schools that won reprieve, kept doors open

Seven Chicago Public Schools that seemed doomed to go away in a record round of school closings won a last-minute reprieve in May that felt, said parents. But now an uncertainty has set in about what the upcoming school year could look like, given budget cuts at some of those schools.

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Matthew Zalaznick's picture

Federal funds no panacea for struggling schools

Many people believe that more money is not an assurance that schools will improve. This new review from the Georgia DOE will give them evidence to support that contention.

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Lauren Williams's picture

Arts education strong on La.

The arts-in-education movement began in the early 1980s when the Getty Art Education Institute in California developed teacher training to incorporate the visual art in teaching language arts, mathematics, science and social studies. This method was known as Discipline Based Arts Education (DBAE). The name has changed over the years, but the concepts remain the same.

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Lauren Williams's picture

Boston’s education mayor?

Two decades after the Education Reform Act of 1993 set the ambitious, but so far elusive, goal of raising all students to academic proficiency, there is growing momentum behind a fundamental rethinking of urban education that some believe could provide the foundation to actually reach that goal.

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Lauren Williams's picture

American education and the IQ trap

A national survey in 2011 found that the predominant method of assessment, by far, is the administration of IQ tests and standardized academic tests.

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