Opinion

Why P-TECH High School in Brooklyn may be future of U.S. economy

It’s a three-year-old school with only about 300 students, but Pathways in Technology Early College High School, or P-TECH, is being called, by a very highly-placed source, the future of America’s presence in the global economy. That source is none other than President Barack Obama.

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Schools must better balance technology and privacy rights

One side to the technology debate revolves around storage of the copious amounts of data collected by schools, districts, and state education departments. So much data is floating around that districts across the U.S. have turned to private companies to store information in the cloud. These companies protect files with high-level encryption, but still, privacy rights advocates are challenging districts that rely on third parties to store data outside of schools.

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iPad buyers wrong in thinking high tech yields better education

School boards are sometimes attracted to shiny things—like iPads. The district claims it wants to close the technology gap, but Corvallis, Ore., isn’t particularly resource-lacking. Most students have the basic resources available for homework and research, and students who don’t have access can utilize not only school computers but also library technology.

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Technology will not replace teachers

Teachers, administrators, parents, and students alike are being told that technology is the whetstone with which we can all sharpen our education system. Technology can open doors, expand minds, and change the world, but it's not the panacea it's been made out to be. As much innovation as the iPad may bring to the classroom, it's not going to replace a teacher anytime soon.

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Cyberschool taxpayers stuck with legal fees?

Due to an ongoing investigation and criminal charges filed against its founder, the Pennsylvania Cyber Charter School spent nearly half a million dollars on legal fees in the past year. That’s bad news for the taxpayers all across Pennsylvania, who fund the public school. Even worse is the realization that any repayment to the school might not come for a long time, if ever.

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A reality check about computer labs at public schools

My co-founder and I at Playmation Studios are exploring how our English-language learning program can be used in schools. We want our software to be used by the largest number of students possible, among students who might not otherwise have access to our programs because they don’t have a computer at home.

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CoSN survey reveals widespread need for increased bandwidth

This week, CoSN released its key preliminary findings from a nationwide survey about broadband and the E-rate. Nearly 450 K12 ed tech leaders representing 44 states participated in the survey and overwhelmingly agreed that the E-rate is in dire need of reform.

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Our future depends on putting tech education at the core

My courses are demanding. I expect students to read and write daily, to meet online after school for concept and skills reviews, and to practice using skills that will help them in college and career. They view my academy and computer science courses as college-level, and want others to view them that way too. Unfortunately, the courses I teach aren't a part of the core curriculum. Instead, they're seen by many as electives and therefore expendable.

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Flipped classes boost grades 5 percent. Is that all we can expect?

Classrooms across the nation are adopting a new technology trend known as the “flipped” classroom, where students watch lecture videos as homework and teachers use class-time for discussion. First popularized by YouTube sensation Sal Khan three years ago, the flipped model gained traction far faster than researchers had time to study it.

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What we can learn from Rupert Murdoch, News Corp., and Amplify

Since News Corp. may be the only organization with sufficient economic muscle and distribution know-how to make a difference in education, I feel that, unless a disagreeable political or moral stance is explicitly present in Amplify, then those issues shouldn't influence my evaluation of the tablet and its content.

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