Opinion

Who should pay for classroom technology?

As more school systems embrace online education, questions of who pays for the technology keep cropping up. For some systems, obtaining the technology to advance their students' skills means adjusting their school budget priorities. The ultimate solution, however, may be for foundations, donors, or tech companies to step in and cover the cost of tablets for every student.

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What are schools doing with students’ data?

The student privacy debate is highly political. Big data collections can be very useful for determining patterns and changing programs. But schools also need to be extremely careful in what they collect, the companies they share it with, and what happens to the data later. And they need to do a better job of informing parents.

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L.A. Unified exemplifies the forces that stifle public school reform

By now, Los Angeles Unified was supposed to be the technological model for big-city school systems with its iPad project. Instead the district has become a national model of the tensions that stifle public school reform. Our technology projects were stranded between high-minded ideals and grass-roots realities; tripped up by jockeying over priorities, politics and power.

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Textbooks and tech: classrooms in transition in Tennessee

Metro Nashville Public Schools’ decision not to buy new social studies textbooks when they were due to be replaced has sparked much discussion about the future of textbooks. It is evident that our leaders and educators are looking to the future and helping our students prepare for tomorrow by experimenting with and using a variety of tools to enhance the educational experience.

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The teacher-less classroom is not as close as you think

A popular vision of the future of education in the internet age is that teachers will become superfluous, but research suggests that the goal of students directing their own learning is still a dream and the teacher-less classroom is not as close as you think.

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Newark’s strategy for vocational schools provides an interstate model

In Newark, N.J., Essex County Vocational Technical Schools are graduating 96 percent of their students, many of them earning professional licenses. Buffalo, N.Y., with similar demographics to Newark, can replicate their success, but Buffalo will need some help and accomodations from the state.

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Encourage women's involvement in tech at an early age

It is an entrepreneur's duty to help foster an interest in technology in women and other underrepresented groups at an early age by actively engaging with local community groups, schools, educational institutions and established organizations, such as Girls Who Code or Black Girls Code.

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How Google, Apple and other tech firms envision education

The companies who offer the most capable, cost-efficient education-tailored hardware and software are likely to see the classrooms and students of the future adopting their devices. Some of the most visible companies offering educational tools and hardware are Google, which recently released its newest tool, Classroom, Apple with more than 75,000 education apps and Facebook, which is piloting a program to provide free WiFi access to students’ homes.

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Driving blended learning at the state level

As blended learning continues to grow, one of the challenges education leaders are facing is the fact that knowledge of the concept spreads faster than expertise on how to foster and support it.

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Looking beyond building a digital, no-books library

The physical books on shelves occupy a shrinking portion of library budgets. The digital-only library is far from a utopian information commons, where the voices weighing in on every conceivable topic may be heard. Rather, that utopian commons is the traditional, albeit well-resourced, library with several generations worth of collection expertise and strong bargaining power against the electronic vendors.

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