Opinion

Ban "digital" learning

It’s time to ban “digital” learning. We’ve amplified the virtues, necessity, promise and potential of technology so much that we are perilously close to forgetting what it was all about in the first place: helping teachers to teach and students to learn.

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Understanding how technology helps today's students

Many commissioners and board members can be skeptical about technology. That is not to say they disapprove. However, they may fail to see the connection between technology and learning to read, doing essential math and understanding history. Commissioners are not alone. Many people older than today’s millenials and young students find technology frustrating, even incomprehensible.

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The STEM shortage myth

You've likely seen stories in the news media over the past decade about the impending shortage of qualified STEM graduates being produced by U.S. schools. When you cut through the rhetoric, there are shortages in some narrow fields, but no empirical evidence to suggest that STEM is facing a broad and widespread shortage.

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Education requires innovation in Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh public schools are in need of innovation. A 30-person team of teachers, community leaders and officials, formulated by the Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers and Great Public Schools, hopes to analyze a community-learning school model that has proven to be successful in Cincinnati school districts.

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Utah earns digital learning excellence

Utah was in the top spot again among all 50 states on the Foundation for Excellence in Education's Digital Learning Report Card. Many in the education establishment criticize Utah for its large class sizes and low per-pupil spending. However, the state emerges as the vanguard of the nation, with a 92.3 percent score.

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Are classroom gadgets really helping kids learn?

For the last six years, the buzz about educational technology has grown deafening. Schools are scrambling to figure out just how a new generation of technology—software and devices both in the marketplace and still to be developed—might better educate kids. We need to make sure hype doesn’t overtake good judgment.

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Mentors help create a sustainable pipeline for women in STEM

Women make up about half of the workforce in America, but they only represent 24 percent of the workforce in STEM fields. The Million Women Mentor program is working to create a sustainable pipeline of women by mobilizing and engaging one million men and women to serve as STEM mentors by 2018.

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Tech executive calls for U.S. investment in STEM education

Only 16 percent of U.S. high school seniors are considered proficient in mathematics and are also interested in a STEM career. American businesses can no longer accept the status quo. We have an obligation to foster a passion for STEM education right here in our country.

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Tech + lax boundaries can = teacher misconduct

There’s something about technology, social media and the relaxed boundaries they seem to encourage that are contributing to what some observers perceive as a growing problem of inappropriate teacher-student contact

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Common Core will put school technology to the test

A year from now, Washington students will take the latest round of standardized tests on a computer. A lot of students will log into several devices all at the same time, within a short window, taking up significant chunks of their district’s bandwidth. As the state transitions to the new technology-based tests, districts are preparing their technological infrastructures—namely computers and Internet capacity.

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