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Arizona's credit posture dims from ruling on school aid

A recent court ruling that resets education spending in Arizona will hurt the state's creditworthiness a bit but could improve that of various school districts. Moody's Investors Service didn't announce any upgrades or downgrades as a result of a Superior Court ruling earlier this month that requires the state to increase school funding by $317 million, starting this fall.

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School vouchers can go out ahead of ruling in North Carolina

A North Carolina judge won't block a state agency from distributing taxpayer money to cover private school tuition in advance of a hearing to determine whether the program is legal. The State Educational Assistance Authority will be paying out $10 million in government-funded scholarships to students who won a lottery for tuition assistance to attend private or religious schools.

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Des Moines drops most middle school advanced classes

Advanced English and science classes will no longer be offered in the Iowa system's middle schools this year, a move that has some parents concerned that top performers won't be challenged. Instead, students will have the option to complete honors-level assignments in all subjects within general education classrooms.

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Report spotlights New York City school failures

A new report from the Families for Excellent Schools charter advocacy group found that in nearly a quarter of New York City public schools, 90 percent or more of the students failed to demonstrate proficiency in language arts and math. The study analyzed test data on the New York City Department of Education website.

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More charter school allegations in Ohio

State Auditor Dave Yost’s special audit of a chain of 19 charter schools is expected to cover new allegations by Innovation Ohio about test scores from the Horizon Science Academy High School in Columbus. The Ohio Department of Education will have a look as well.

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New Illinois law enables more school workers to give emergency injections

Trained school employees and volunteers will be allowed to administer an emergency epinephrine injection if they believe a student or visitor is having an allergic reaction under a new bill. The legislation expands on a 2011 law that allowed school nurses to give the drug to any student believed to be having a life-threatening allergic reaction.

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North Carolina budget deal includes a raise for teachers

Leaders of the Republican-controlled North Carolina legislature announced details of a tentative budget agreement, including a 7 percent pay raise for teachers in public schools. The $21.3 billion spending plan earmarks $282 million for teacher salary increases.

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Unions put teachers on streets for votes

Teachers unions are struggling to protect their political clout, but as the midterm elections approach, they’re fighting back with their most popular asset: the teachers themselves. Backed by tens of millions in cash and new data mining tools that let them personalize pitches to voters, the unions are sending armies of educators to run a huge get-out-the-vote effort.

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Hundreds of New York City schools change start time

More than 450 city schools will change the start time of classes in September to comply with rules in the new teachers union contract to set aside extra time for teacher training and parent conferences. Some parents say they had no say in the impending widespread change and will have to overhaul their own schedules and disrupt their children's lives to get them to school on time.

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Pinellas School Board gives early approval to $1.2 billion budget

The Florida county gave preliminary approval to a $1.2 billion budget, which includes a general operating fund increase of nearly 13.1 million this year to $878.8 million. The school district will also see a nearly $25 million increase in state funding.

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