Top News

San Francisco school board divided on using interns as teachers

With 500 teaching jobs to fill by the first day of school this fall, San Francisco’s superintendent has asked the school board to let him hire more Teach for America interns for hard-to-staff schools. But some board members are balking, saying students in those schools deserve experienced teachers.

Read more

School merger is an alternative to New York City’s small-school model

A decade after New York City shut down a large, struggling middle school in Brooklyn and replaced it with two smaller ones, the Education Department is putting those schools back together. The most important factor in whether other schools will be merged would not be their size, but whether one school has a principal capable of running both schools.

Read more

Students benefit from school closures, report shows

After examining closed charter and district schools, a new Thomas B. Fordham Institute study found that moving from school to school typically has a negative effect on students, but when the movement is forced by school closure, the students end up better off.

Read more

North Carolina House votes to let school boards keep power to sue

House lawmakers voted down an attempt to strip school boards in North Carolina of the power to sue county boards of commissioners over budget disputes. The bill would have blocked lawsuits by school boards, forcing the two boards into mediation instead.

Read more

Ala.’s high-school football arms race includes facilities that are very expensive

Just as high-school football coaching salaries in Alabama have skyrocketed recently, so has the demand for newer, better — and more expensive sports facilities throughout the state. Three of the seven public schools in Baldwin County now have state-of-the-art indoor practice facilities, including one with a new $14 million stadium.

Read more

Minn. high schools scramble to meet ACT's many test-day requirements

Test anxiety is hitting Minnesota school administrators as they prepare for the first ever statewide American College Test for high school juniors. To meet protocol, many high schools have rearranged schedules for thousands of other students — scheduling field trips, giving students “digital day” assignments to do from home, or even canceling school altogether.

Read more

Walsenburg school gives students hands-on way to thank veterans

Students and recent graduates of Career Building Academy, an alternative, trades-oriented charter high school in Colorado Springs, will help construct a 5,300-square-foot house for families of military veterans who are moving their loved ones to a nearby nursing home.

Read more

Schools shouldn't be bugged about head lice, doctors say

The American Academy of Pediatrics is recommending that students not be sent home from school if lice are discovered. Pediatricians are urging reason over emotion when it comes to reaction toward head lice, saying that the bugs are a mere nuisance and don’t justify suspension from school or a rush toward prescription medication.

Read more

In Texas, questions about prosecuting truancy

In most states, missing a lot of school means a trip to the principal's office. In Texas, truancy there is treated as a criminal offense, a class C misdemeanor. The problem is so big, state lawmakers and the U.S. Justice Department are investigating whether prosecuting children and teenagers in adult criminal courts is doing more harm than good.

Read more

Fewer chances in school sports for minority girls, report says

Minority girls in Massachusetts have fewer chances to play high school sports than white girls and fewer than boys of any race, according to a new national report. Heavily minority schools, on average, offer fewer than half as many spots on teams compared with heavily white schools and they give about 60 percent of those spots to boys.

Read more

Pages