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Artificially intelligent math for school educators

IBM’s Watson computing system identifies the academic prerequisites and standards mapped out for each lesson. (Gettyimages.com: just_super).
IBM’s Watson computing system identifies the academic prerequisites and standards mapped out for each lesson. (Gettyimages.com: just_super).

IBM’s Watson computing system—perhaps the world’s most well-known artificial intelligence technology—now provides K5 educators with a database of open educational math resources.

Teacher Advisor With Watson 1.0, powered by Watson Discovery Service’s artificial intelligence technology and hosted on IBM Cloud at www.TeacherAdvisor.org, can rapidly analyze content for relevant concepts based on a teacher’s search query.

It currently offers over 2,000 free lessons, teaching plans, activities and videos.


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A teacher, for example, could search for a lesson on “collaborative learning with fractions.”

The system might then recommend a team competition in comparing fractions or a lesson in which students create posters showing the relationship between the whole part and a fractional part, according to the IBM Foundation.

While those specific lessons do not include the exact words “collaborative learning,” Watson understands natural language and provides teachers with the most relevant math resources.


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The American Federation of Teachers, school boards, over 1,000 teachers and other educational experts analyzed the system’s content in the lengthy beta testing phase.

Now teachers and other users will provide feedback so Watson’s cognitive technology will intuitively hone its ability to make better recommendations.

In addition to offering math resources for diverse classrooms of students, the system identifies the academic prerequisites and standards mapped out for each lesson.