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Articles: Technology

Personalized learning solutions are helping educators leverage digital curriculum technology to create individualized learning paths for each student based on personalized and adaptive instruction, while helping to provide remediation for struggling students, supportive practice for on-level students and enrichment for advanced students. The leading personalized learning curriculum programs are based on decades of rigorous research and apply learning science to engage students, empower educators and improve outcomes. 

Imagine being able to reach out, touch and manipulate an object you’ve designed – before the object exists physically in the real world. That’s the premise and promise of virtual reality, and it’s something a company called zSpace offers classrooms around the country.

With zSpace, students and teachers can “lift” digital objects—such as a human skeleton—from the screen and manipulate them in three dimensions, but without any messy, real-world consequences.

In four Utica Community elementary schools in metro Detroit, students as young as 10 manipulate and pull apart the organs of the body, build roller coasters, and design and test 3D prototypes.

Peter LaMoreaux is a digital learning strategist who guides teachers in optimizing student learning. He is the instructional technology specialist at Brewster Central School District.

The implementation of digital learning tools is an effective means of maximizing student learning. Operations in this environment also better prepare students for their future endeavors in academia, employment and life. 

With personalized learning on the rise, more K12 educators are looking for learning management systems that easily identify content based on individual student needs.

In a classroom in New Hampshire, second-graders pull out iPads to film themselves discussing the characters of a book they are reading.

PINT-SIZE COMPUTERS—First-graders, above, at Elizabeth Forward School District start learning how to think like a computer.

A large gap between the number of computer science graduates and available jobs has led an increasing number of districts to boost instruction in computational thinking.

Since Houston ISD started using Online Assessment Planning Tool in 2015, web-based assessments there rose from 3 percent to an estimated high of 50 percent by late May 2017. (GettyImages.com).

Making the transformation from traditional to online assessments can cause confusion for many districts, even when it comes to basic definitions.

School system leaders need guidance to advance and achieve technology goals.

Jennifer Spring, superintendent of Cohoes City School District near Albany, New York, received a phone call from a local senior center in fall 2016 inquiring if any of her high school students could help senior citizens learn technology.

Since January 2017, junior and senior honors student have spent about an hour each Tuesday afternoon helping seniors set up laptops, operate smartphones, archive digital photos and organize email inboxes.

Richard Culatta, a longtime ISTE member and past recipient of the ISTE “Making IT Happen” award, is the new CEO of the International Society for Technology in Education.

Richard Culatta is the new CEO of the International Society for Technology in Education.

Chris Wolk is the principal at Avon Center School in Round Lake Beach, Illinois. He is a regional director for the Illinois Principal Association and a certified principal mentor with the National Association of Elementary School Principals.

Principal preparation programs continue to place more demands on candidates, in some cases requiring a yearlong internship. 

Ultimately, the answer to delivering school bandwidth might require a radical rethink in which districts scrap expensive IT infrastructure in favor of pure wireless connections.

Source: The Broadband Imperative II: Equitable Access for Learning, SEDTA (DAmag.me/bbd)

Educators and students, of course, increasingly rely on the internet for everything from online curriculum and research to playing edu-games and posting grades.

Years ago, educators at Fremont Middle School in Illinois provided students with engaging projects. But not until the 2015-16 school year did teachers have designated areas where students could work on assignments comfortably or have access to digital technology. 

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