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Articles: Technology

Districts have several options when introducing a badging program.

For students, the process tends to be more intricate because these badges, often awarded for soft skills and career-preparation activities, contain metadata that details what students did to earn the badges. Such higher-tech “open badges” can be shared on social media and live on an online platform such as Credly, Mozilla or Badgr.

Districts are advised to go through the graphic design process to create high-quality badges that drive engagement—rather than using stock art.

A growing number of districts now award digital badges to students who demonstrate creativity and critical thinking, and even for noteworthy experiences in after-school programs.

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rior to Aileen Parsons becoming director of human resources for Pleasanton USD in northern California, she was a school principal in the district. The memory of hiring paperwork was fresh in Parsons’ mind when she switched jobs in November 2015. 

Matt Miller is the new superintendent of Lakota Local Schools in Ohio.

Matt Miller, new superintendent of Ohio’s Lakota Local Schools, is reaching community members with his social media savviness.

In an effort to promote movement and educational growth, schools are adding playground equipment for younger students. (Gettyimages.com: fatcamera).

The growing evidence showing that students learn better when they get a chance to move has inspired K12 designers to create classroom furniture and playground equipment that keep youths active, even as they learn.

Many states lack well-defined computer science standards; others don’t count computer science courses toward core graduation requirements. And in many districts, computer science courses aren’t reaching enough students.

GREEN IS GOOD—In this propagation map of Albemarle County, colors show signal quality for broadband. Green is nearly unobstructed.

Free internet access at home will soon be a reality for students in Albemarle County Public Schools.

Fast disappearing from schools are internet “lock and block” policies that keep students off social media and restrict them to carefully curated websites. Even with sophisticated filters and firewalls, today’s learners carry all the access in the world in their back pockets.

Every K12 IT manager wants all school software to work together seamlessly, but incompatible programs often prevent the sharing of key data.

The latest K12 school designs in classrooms favor versatile and adaptive spaces to support blended and project-based learning, as well as other progressive education techniques.

The future of fidget spinners remains uncertain for the 2017-18 school year. (Gettyimages.com: J2R).

Whirling fidget spinners invaded classrooms across the country this past spring, but with many schools banning them as a distraction, their future as a potential remedy for students with attention difficulties is in doubt.

Superintendent of School District of Clay County Addison Davis appointed 12 new principals.

Addison Davis, superintendent of the School District of Clay County in Florida, appointed 12 new principals for eight elementary schools, two junior high schools and two high schools to improve teaching and learning.

As more teaching and learning activities go digital, district leaders must find ways to provide 24/7 internet availability to all their students.

For common communications, such as early dismissal notices, some schools create generic translated versions in key languages.

CIOs can play a key role in their district’s efforts to increase parent engagement as part of wider initiatives to advance equity.

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