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Articles: Technology

VIEWS YOU CAN USE—A teacher wearing smart glasses (right) can see student information projected in an augmented reality platform (left) developed by Carnegie Mellon University. The hovering icons indicate how students are faring on online assignments and if they need help.

When edtech developers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pennsylvania asked K12 teachers to wish for a superpower, the teachers imagined student data hovering in midair. Smart glasses can now provide that feedback. 

With starting salaries for teachers hovering around an average of $38,600, educators are tapping the rising gig economy for second jobs. This has led districts to consider new policies to prevent disruptions or distractions.

From Project Tomorrow, here are the most used digital content forms by district type and platform.

Forty-three percent of principals and other district leaders say that digital content is an effective tool for enabling equity, according to a recent report from Project Tomorrow. Here are the most used forms by district type and platform.

HANDS-ON TECH—Students in the Startable Pittsburgh summer program learn STEM-friendly skills in addition to basic aspects of entrepreneurship.

Students in the Startable Pittsburgh summer program learn STEM-friendly skills in addition to basic aspects of entrepreneurship.

From left to right: Serapio Trillayes, Executive Director of Curriculum and Instruction, Rio Grande City CISD (Texas); Karen Ingram, National Education Consultant, Istation

There are a variety of steps that administrators can take to create a data-driven district culture that will help teachers use the right data in the right way to address the diverse learning needs of students and lead powerful learning outcomes across schools.

Most current assessment systems rely on generating data in order to identify, sort and label students, as well as educators. But this approach is at odds with what has always been the true purpose of effective assessment, which should instead be to build hope, efficacy and achievement for both learners and educators.

Providers respond: “What are some common misconceptions schools have when purchasing charging and storage platforms? How can K12 leaders plan to make the right purchase for their district?”

Charging and storage capabilities: Alabama, California, Pennsylvania and Texas districts at a glance

The challenge for Grapevine-Colleyville ISD in Texas was to make it easier for students to have their devices repaired at school.

Matthew Joseph is director of digital learning and innovation for Milford Public Schools in Massachusetts.

Matthew Joseph, who led the first 1-to-1 device rollout in a Massachusetts public school more than a decade ago, is now overseeing another implementation. His advice: Empower staff with a shared vision and a culture of risk-taking and trust.

Charging and storage solutions are selected not just for their main functions, but also to maximize instruction time. Here are innovative solutions from district technology officials and vendors.

FUTURES TAKE FLIGHT—CTE students at Duval High School in Maryland will soon be able to obtain their drone pilot’s license before they graduate.

How three high schools are implementing CTE programs to help students succeed in high-tech careers.

A Duval High School CTE student uses music and dance to teach the principles of flight.

With the manufacturing industry increasingly seeking workers with more advanced tech skills, high school career and technical education programs now focus heavily on robotics, unmanned aviation technology and mechatronics to help students jump-start potentially lucrative careers.

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, you may be making your students, staff and parents feel excluded. If you answered “no” to each, you’re taking a great approach.

Educators and administrators should ask themselves these questions to determine whether they’re respecting identities and cultures by learning students’ and staff members’ names.  

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