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Articles: Technology

Mooresville Graded School District (MGSD) in Mooresville, N.C. is known nationally for its Digital Conversion, where every 4th through 12th grade student is issued a MacBook® to take home, every third grader has a laptop to use at school, and every kindergarten through 3rd grade classroom uses a SMART Board™ and interactive clickers. MGSD’s focus for their digital transformation has always been on engaging students to achieve results and add value to their academic performance, with the right technology as an enabler.

Collaborative learning and small group activities can facilitate higher-level thinking in students. However, it can be difficult for teachers to effectively evaluate that all groups and students are on-task and learning, and it can be challenging for students to communicate with their teachers in a small group setting.

For a 1:1 initiative to be successful, it is important to consider the student learning objectives, not just the technology for its own sake. Utilizing technology effectively in the classroom can facilitate and enhance collaborative, problem-based learning experiences. This web seminar, originally presented on September 26, 2013, featured administrators from Baldwin County (Ala.) Public Schools and their implementation of a 1:1 program in a district with 30,000 students.

Blended learning holds significant promise as a cost-effective and egalitarian means to help higher numbers of students accelerate their learning, graduate, and meet challenges in a competitive world. In this web seminar, orginially broadcast on September 18, 2013, education technology expert Tom Vander Ark shared the keys to making personalized learning work for the greatest number of students through adaptive digital instruction, particularly Intelligent Adaptive Learning.

Elementary students in Metropolitan School District in Indiana use Chromebooks for lessons and assessments.

At least one midwestern district is ready—or at least thinks it’s ready—for what most states are calling Common Core assessments. The Metropolitan School District of Warren Township, Ind., an urban district in Indianapolis, had a jumpstart on technology and assessments thanks in part to a three-year, $28.5 million Race to the Top grant.

Some 89 percent of adults are concerned that third-party providers will use students’ personal data for marketing purposes, according to a new survey.

District CIOs need to have a complete understanding of a district’s legal obligations to protect student data as more student information is stored with online, third-party providers and parents’ privacy concerns reach new heights, technology experts say.

Some 89 percent of adults are concerned that third-party providers will use students’ personal data for marketing purposes, according to a new survey.

Kathy Cook is the director of educational technology and a faculty member for the College of Education at University of Phoenix.

A recent survey from the College of Education at University of Phoenix reveals that K12 teachers struggle to integrate social media into their classroom lessons, and also to connect with students and parents outside their classrooms.

Robert Nelson, superintendent of Chawanakee Unified SD, oversees students working on refurbished Apple MacBooks, saving the district thousands of dollars. (Photo: Will Drosche)

Just five years ago, Chawanakee USD, a small rural district nestled in the foothills of the Sierra Mountains in northern California, and the North Kansas City School District, a suburban district located just north of Kansas City, Mo., were at the starting lines of the digital revolution.

Snow days are melting away as schools increasingly take advantage of online curriculum to keep students learning virtually during weather closures.

Daisy Dyer Duerr, principal of St. Paul High School in Arkansas, created the educational twitter chat, #ArkEdChat.

The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) named three winners of its annual Digital Principals Award: Daisy Dyer Duerr, principal of St. Paul High School in Arkansas; Jason Markey, principal of East Leyden High School in Illinois; and Derek McCoy, principal of Spring Lake Middle School in North Carolina.

To meet the Common Core State Standards, students must develop the 21st-century skills needed for college and career success. Districts must adapt their curriculum to ensure students are being taught these digital skills. This web seminar, originally broadcast on September 19, 2013, addressed integrating technology into the classroom in a practical way, how district leaders and teachers must work together to address curriculum change, and the software that can help students prepare for the rigor of Common Core assessments.

A blended learning approach to English Language Learner instruction has been demonstrated to produce better results, and more quickly than classroom instruction only. Thesys International has developed an Acquired English Proficiency program that utilizes blended learning to improve reading, speaking, and writing skills for ESL students. The program emphasizes academic English and better prepares them for mainstream courses in much shorter time than the national average.

With both Common Core testing and a 2013-2014 districtwide BYOD initiative looming, Rockwood School District in St. Louis County, Mo., required a strong Ethernet connection between buildings. As the district spans 150 square miles, the large area needed high-level coverage. According to Will Blaylock, the district’s CIO, the provider the district had been using prior to July 2013 had been meeting the district’s needs, but they were looking for more.

Students in the app development class at Grover Cleveland High School in Queens, N.Y., met with hearing-impaired community members.

Students in a STEM pilot project at Grover Cleveland High School in Queens, N.Y., have developed a number of innovative mobile apps to help the hearing impaired.

Though just 19 percent of California’s elementary schools are using blended learning, another 20 percent are planning implementation.

Blended learning is becoming entrenched in California schools, but elementary schools and high schools are taking different approaches when integrating this learning technology.

Elementary schools are using the “station rotation” model, in which students in small groups may spend 20 minutes in a reading center, followed by 20 minutes at a computer using an online learning program, and an additional 20 minutes of small group instruction with the teacher.

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