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Articles: Technology

District CIOs recommend following the Cybersecurity Framework created by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, or NIST. The model recommends five functions to address cybersecurity threats.

Districts should develop a strategy for network, application, content, endpoint, cloud/data center, and physical security, according to a Council of the Great City Schools report.

The “Cyber-Security in Today’s K-12 Environment” report from the Council of the Great City Schools outlines six areas of security. Districts should develop a strategy for each one.

When securing edtech infrastructure, district leaders must concentrate on six layers of security—physical, network, applications, content, endpoint and cloud/data centers—to build a comprehensive defense against increasing and evolving cyberattacks.

Eileen Belastock is chief technology officer for Mount Greylock Regional School District in Massachusetts.

Voice-activated tools can create more immersive learning experiences, but school leaders need to consider the potential privacy risks and to safeguard student data.

When Rio Grande City Consolidated ISD introduced a digital reading program two years ago, some teachers balked at student assessments being performed by a computer. Those concerns abated as teachers saw increased proficiency for the 4,100 students using Istation Reading and Istation Español, says Serapio Trillayes, executive director for curriculum and instruction for the district, which is located in South Texas, near the Mexican border.

Individuals can use this browser-based system to send color-coded email and text alerts to administrators and first responders through networked devices, such as desktops and smartphones. 

What does the routing process look like at First Student?

With 22 of the 26 school districts in Northcentral Technical College’s area of Wisconsin expressing a need for middle school and high school technology teachers, the college has partnered with Marian University to train more educators.

Source: The Tech Edvocate

From taking inventory of edtech and software licenses to weighing long-term and upfront product costs, here are five tips to consider when managing edtech.


LINK TO MAIN ARTICLE: Out-of-this-world STEM for middle schoolers


Smart TVs and whiteboards allow even more students to collaborate. Depending on the model, students can interact with a touch screen in 10 to 32 different places simultaneously. Many of these displays come with screen mirroring capabilities and apps that are loaded with learning activities.

Randy Ziegenfuss, Superintendent, Salisbury Township School District

Randy Ziegenfuss, a Pennsylvania-based superintendent, shares three tips on how leaders can shift from a school-centered mindset to a learner-centered one.

Innovation expert Ted Dintersmith is the author of What School Could Be (Princeton University Press, 2018).

In his new book What School Could Be, innovation expert Ted Dintersmith profiles schools that focus on innovation and “real” learning, rather than endlessly drilling on formulas and definitions that don’t matter in today’s world.

1. Server room to classroom—Expand your focus from maintaining networks and hardware to helping choose instructional software.

2. Gearhead to gear guide—Fix devices and show teachers and students how to use them.

3. Tech provider to tech trimmer—Assess what programs and applications drive student achievement.

4. Data generator to data analyzer—Provide easy-to-read reports from various platforms so administrators and teachers can quickly assess student progress.

Districts moving aggressively into personalized learning covet IT leaders who not only understand instruction, but who also have the technology chops to make decisions about devices and networks.

Linda L. Briggs has been writing about the intersection of technology and education for over 25 years, with a focus on government and education.

The most effective PD programs are scalable, encourage networking and use technology to serve learning when and where teachers can use it.

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