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Articles: Technology

Nevada recently launched an online reporting system for parents and students, joining a handful of other states and districts in efforts to combat bullying.

A lack of PD for teachers and principals hinders schools from achieving the full benefits of personalized learning, according to an analysis by MAPLE.

In a survey, readers described how their roles in education are changing and how their responsibilities will evolve in the coming years.

Some of the latest models of nontraditional furniture rolling into schools feature sit-stand desks, stackable stools with tiltable surfaces, adjustable tables and desks with bikes.

AI will also have a big impact on network and data security.

The best way to keep a school’s computers free of malware while securing student and teacher identities is to use a layered approach powered by artificial intelligence in the cloud.

Just about every antivirus program has three overlapping defenses:


Link to main story: AI accelerates in K12


Rose Luckin is the chair of learning with digital technologies at University College London’s Knowledge Lab.

Until recently, the quality of classroom instruction relied almost entirely on a teacher’s resourcefulness, motivation and intelligence. Soon, it will also depend on artificial intelligence.

Fifteen states, including California and West Virginia, have adopted Discovery Education’s Techbooks for classroom use.

Growing mental health needs of students ranked as one of the major issues facing educators who participated in DA’s 2018 Outlook Survey.

Ken Trump (ken@schoolsecurity. org) is the president of National School Safety and Security Services.

How can administrators prepare staff with best practices and reasonable emergency plans? How can you communicate safety to your parents in a social media world on digital steroids?

New Product Showcase brings together the latest innovative products and service solutions in K12 education in one easy-to-use reference section.

Three years ago, Rob Stratton was seeking a way to simplify access to online resources for more than 93,000 students and 11,000 staff in Florida’s Lee County School District. Stratton, who is the coordinator for K12 instructional technology for Lee County, wanted students and teachers to spend less time managing accounts through the district’s website and more time using instructional software in the classroom.

“We spent more time talking about how to log in and not enough time about how to use the resources,” Stratton says.

David Liss was seeing a unique challenge when it came to implementing 1-to-1 technology for the 6,200 students in Nixa Public Schools, one of the top-performing districts in Missouri.

“One of the things that kept coming up for us was there wasn’t data to support the premise that 1-to-1 technology increased student performance,” says Liss, who is Nixa’s executive director of technology. “In lower-performing districts, the data showed that 1-to-1 technology was increasing engagement, which was increasing student performance.”

The past two decades have seen 1-to-1 computing grow in popularity, with school districts across the country deploying millions of laptops and tablets to students, excited by their potential to enhance learning. But unfortunately, with the trend came the reality that many school systems didn’t adequately plan, prepare for or sustain their 1-to-1 initiatives, and failed to see positive impacts as a result. Why do some 1-to-1 initiatives succeed and others fail?

Six years ago, Waconia Public Schools, which is 35 miles west of Minneapolis, launched a 1-to-1 technology initiative. It purchased tablets as part of a pilot program for 10th-grade students. 

After determining that the pilot program was successful, the district expanded it to include students in fourth, eighth and 11th grades. At that point, the district realized that this was not a sustainable program for the long term. 

Putting technology into classrooms has been a focus for Gwinnett County Public Schools, located in a suburb of Atlanta, for decades. First it was using overhead or slide projectors, and later televisions. Before the district made the decision to add projectors to all classrooms, schools would buy a few on their own, but there was no standardization across schools. 

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