You are here

Articles: Teaching & Learning

What should change about the current culture of mathematics instruction?

When Kristie Autrey became curriculum director for Mitchell County School District in North Carolina, and learned the state had partnered with Learning Ally, she jumped at the chance to implement it.

Two years ago, the Mehlville School District in suburban St. Louis passed a tax levy that included dedicated funding for professional development and strategic plans focusing on middle school STEM programs. For Tina Plummer, assistant superintendent for teaching and learning in Mehlville, that meant implementing the STEM Innovator program with Discovery Education, where staff had ongoing professional development and coaching focused on STEM education and career opportunities.

The spread of learning on mobile devices has driven providers to push science platforms into the cloud.

Students in seventh-grade math classes are not necessarily ready for seventh-grade math. They may be rusty in concepts taught in sixth grade, or ready for high-level applications covered in high school.

That is why the ALEKS® personalized learning program from McGraw-Hill Education is an integral part of the math curriculum in Oak Creek-Franklin middle schools, says Annalee Bennin, director of curriculum and assessment for the southeastern Wisconsin district.

In the 10 years leading up to Madison School District’s latest math curriculum update, state standards had changed almost too often to count. So it is understandable that the Phoenix-based district would welcome a program that ensured all material complied with current standards. 

REACHING AT-RISK STUDENTS—Through Berkeley Township’s Project Reach, at-risk students can participate in Camp Paw, a summer program that provides extra learning opportunities, including reading and STEM activities.

A combination of grants, donations, and discounted materials and services from the community led to the creation of Berkeley Township School District's Project Reach program for at-risk students.

The small rural district of United Local Schools in northeast Ohio has seen its math scores increase in the eight years it has used Everyday Mathematics® in its elementary school classrooms.

In 2015-16, the first school year in which all sixth-grade students had used Everyday Mathematics since kindergarten, those students scored 26.8 percentage points higher than the state average in state math tests. Yet the numbers don’t tell the whole story.

At the fast-growing Manor Independent School District located outside of Austin, Texas, over 38 percent of students are English language learners. These students are expected to master the same standards as their native English-speaking peers. Meredith Roddy, Director of Bilingual and ESL Programs, is tasked with closing the achievement gap between ELL students and native English-speaking students.

“I think of it as an opportunity,” says Roddy. “It’s about finding the right resources to engage ELL students with language and content area learning.”

Repurposing buses no longer suitable for daily transportation has provided schools with mobile makerspaces, traveling cafés and bookmobiles.

Pamela Roggeman is the Academic Dean for the College of Education at University of Phoenix and served for more than 17 years as a secondary education teacher.  

To better understand how—and if—teachers are equipping students to solve real-world problems, we must reflect on teaching practices through sound, formative assessment.

A new movement that promises closer cooperation between higher ed and K12 aims to end this legacy of passing the buck.

Donna Reynolds is principal of Lake Mary High School of Seminole County Public Schools in Florida.

Donna Reynolds, principal of Lake Mary High School of Seminole County Public Schools in Florida, connected with students by performing with the dance team at a pep rally.

Thousands of science teachers around the country are incorporating standards that include the study of climate change. But other educators have found that one of the first questions to answer is exactly how to deliver the lessons.

Head lice are parasitic insects that feed on human blood and live close to the scalp.

Head lice policies are causing controversy throughout the country, as some districts abandon “no nit” rules that require sending home children who have nits (lice eggs) or live lice in their hair.

Pages