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Articles: Teaching & Learning

A Chicago Public Schools teacher leads a social emotional learning lesson in an elementary classroom.

Social-emotional learning programs improve the grades and behavior of all learners—but special ed students may benefit even more from lessons on mindfulness, self-regulation and cooperation, experts say.

Michael B. Horn is a distinguished fellow at the Clayton Christensen Institute and an advisor to Intellus Learning. Julia Freeland Fisher is director of education research at the Clayton Christensen Institute.

Amidst the deluge of interventions—and despite noble intentions—we still lack a coherent, causal understanding of the mechanisms that can solve the achievement gap at scale. Unsurprisingly, efforts to close chronic achievement gaps continue to fall flat.

Jarriza Velasquez, a sixth-grade English/language arts and English as a second language teacher at Alex Sanger Elementary School in Dallas ISD, oversees student work. Velasquez was hired from Puerto Rico as part of the district’s ongoing bilingual teacher recruiting efforts.

Districts facing rising English language learner populations and teacher shortages have turned to Puerto Rico for quality bilingual teachers who don’t need a visa to work on the U.S. mainland. Dallas ISD, for example, hired 350 teachers from Puerto Rico for 2015-16.

Teaching students to dream high is one thing. Teaching them how to help others fly safely is something left to ambitious districts.

Joseph Renzulli is the director of the Neag Center For Creativity, Gifted Education, and Talent Development at the University of Connecticut.

Applying the pedagogy of gifted education to all classrooms can lead to total school improvement. That is the aim of my work, an enrichment-infusion process called the “schoolwide enrichment model,” or SEM.

“Curricular infusion” simply means that we do not argue with the reality of today’s standards and test-driven approaches to school improvement. Rather, we examine materials and teaching strategies that can make the prescribed curriculum more interesting and enjoyable.

Cleveland City Schools Director Martin Ringstaff saw a personalized learning opportunity in a school trip to Nicaragua.

An engineering project in a Tennessee high school grew into a mission to build an innovative dome to grow fresh food for a Central American orphanage. The adventure inspired Cleveland City Schools Director Martin Ringstaff to spread a personalized, project-based learning approach to more of his students.

A first-of-its-kind Connecticut law allows parents to include their child’s paraprofessional in school planning and placement team meetings that create individualized educational programs.

Malika Anderson's takes over Tennessee's Achievement School District, a state-run, turnaround district.

Malika Anderson became superintendent of the Achievement School District in Tennessee this month. She had been the district’s No. 2 official.

The state-run, turnaround district was created in 2010 with a Race to the Top grant. It takes the bottom-performing 5 percent of schools in the state and assigns them to charter operators to help move them to the top 25 percent.

With so much emphasis being placed on testing and accountability, many educators may be missing the single greatest opportunity to drive student outcomes—teacher-created formative assessment with timely, targeted interventions. But can truly personalized learning become a reality when faced with limited classroom time? In this web seminar originally broadcast on October 21, 2015, an administrator from Minnesota’s Edina Public Schools outlined how the district is leveraging powerful assessment solutions to help educators focus their time on what matters most—fueling student growth.

John M. Nelson III served as the Assistant Superintendent for Instructional Services at Chula Vista Elementary School District

For more information, visit www.achieve3000.com

John M. Nelson III served as the Assistant Superintendent for Instructional Services at Chula Vista Elementary School District, located halfway between San Diego and Mexico in San Diego County. In 2010, when the Common Core State Standards were adopted by California, he knew the 30,000-student district needed to help students get comfortable reading and writing about nonfiction texts and using technology for assessments

Online and blended learning continue to grow in use as instructional models while redefining the education landscape, creating better academic outcomes by providing students with the personalized attention, support and resources they need, while enabling teachers to spend more time differentiating instruction. This web seminar, originally broadcast on November 4, 2015, explored some of the keys to using blended and online learning effectively to drive academic growth in any school system.

Computers and mobile devices aren’t just changing the way that content is delivered, they have changed the way that students engage with their learning and the role of the teacher. But, the expansion of 1-to-1 and BYOD initiatives, flipped classrooms, and anytime-anywhere learning has created a variety of management challenges. Administrators are faced with managing a proliferation of laptops, smartphones, tablets, Chromebooks and other devices with small staffs and limited budgets.

Madera USD Superintendent Edward Gonzalez has given his 2,000-plus employees $500 each to pick their own professional development programs.

Superintendent Edward Gonzalez says teachers—and classified employees—can make wise decisions about the classroom and technical training they receive.So he gave each of his roughly 1,100 teachers $500 to spend as they choose on PD in 2014-15, and this year he extended that to classified employees.

Former Washington Post reporter Dale Russakoff's new book, "The Prize: Who’s in Charge of America’s Schools?," looks at public schools in Newark, N.J.

Former Washington Post reporter Dale Russakoff's new book looks at what went wrong with Newark’s ‘Hemisphere of Hope’ and massive grant from Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg that supported the initiative. She says most funds went to hiring consultants, expanding charter schools, closing low-performing schools and subsequently firing teachers.

K12 schools and universities are increasingly purchasing 3D printers such as the MakerBot and integrating them into the curriculum to prepare students for STEM careers.

Analysts expect 3D printer shipments to double worldwide to nearly 496,500 units in 2016—in large part due to demand from K12 schools and universities, according to a new report.

3D printers—devices that create physical objects from digital plans—are more common in STEM classes than in people’s homes, despite manufacturers’ initial expectations for the machines.

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