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Articles: Policy & Compliance

Source: Frontline Research and Learning Institute Survey 2017

A new report by the Frontline Research and Learning Institute sets out to provide actionable insights to help states and local districts address the needs of special needs students equitably.

Blane McCann is the superintendent of Westside Community Schools in Omaha, Nebraska.

Giftedness is not just a test score. How many students have we seen who did not have a test score to qualify for a gifted program but became an expert in an area of passion and interest?

A project by the University of Wyoming allows college students to fine-tune their teaching skills with a roomful of virtual students animated by an actor.

Crafting a strong and well-balanced social media policy requires considerable time and effort. The policy must be flexible enough to accommodate new tech trends yet thorough and specific.

Source: National Institute  for Early Education Research

Big city districts are taking the lead in funding pre-K programs as states work more slowly to expand access.

Rui Dionisio is superintendent of the Verona Public Schools in New Jersey.

Implementing inquiry-based science is one approach to developing critical thinking and personalizing instruction for students by addressing the preconceptions that they bring with them to the classroom.

The zero-out-of-100 is just one of the traditional grading practices schools are rethinking as they seek to report student performance more accurately.

The following districts recognize the benefits of a diverse workforce and have made it a priority. Take a look at some of their practices.

Dyslexia is not correlated with intelligence, says Richard Wagner, associate director of the Florida Center for Reading Research and a professor of psychology at Florida State University.

“If you’re reading at a level at which you do everything else, it’s probably not dyslexia,” Wagner says.

“If you’re reading below the level at which you do other things, it’s more likely to be dyslexia.”

Educators know that most dyslexic students will need interventions and accommodations throughout school, but best practices continue to evolve as more is learned about this reading disability.

Many states have enacted laws and guidelines spelling out how schools can help students with dyslexia.

Such laws vary by state.

According to understood.org, a website on learning and attention issues founded by 15 nonprofit organizations, they generally address issues such as:


Link to main story: How schools are disrupting dyslexia

Beverly Daniel Tatum is an authority on the psychology of racism and a retired president of Spelman College.

20 years after Beverly Daniel Tatum's landmark 1997 book Why Are All The Black Kids Sitting Together In The Cafeteria? was released, she is now back with a fully revised edition.

The Kentucky Valley Educational Cooperative hopes to build a drone-port and collaborative community workspace atop a coal-mined mountain.

States that require recess in elementary school

Connecticut: 20 minutes of supervised recess daily, preferably outdoors

Indiana: Daily physical activity that may include the use of recess

Missouri: Minimum of one 20-minute recess period


Link to main story: Lawmakers requiring more recess in schools

Many schools offering recess provide 15 to 25 minutes of unstructured play daily. (Gettyimages.com: monkeybusinessimages).

A small but growing number of states are requiring school districts to provide recess. Pending legislation in Massachusetts would require schools to provide at least 20 minutes of daily recess in K5.

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