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Articles: Business & Finance

In Fort Lauderdale in March, students and teachers were in shock following the news that a three-vehicle accident involving a semi-trailer truck had killed a Broward County Public Schools fourth-grade teacher, as well as injuring her four grandchildren and another teacher. Numerous parents, staff and students passed the scene of the accident, and rumors began flying.

At times such as this, administrators need to have procedures in place to stifle rumors and help the school community manage its grief. These tips can help.

With public school districts under more pressure than usual in today’s recessed economy to boost revenue and reduce operational expenses, health benefits have become a prime target in union contracts.

 

DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) may be the greatest discovery of the 21st century in understanding the physical makeup of living organisms. It’s also known as genetic code, since it contains the instructions to create a complete functioning organism.

 

The federal stimulus package provides badly needed aid to school districts, allowing them to avoid massive staff and teacher layoffs and injecting them with a healthy dose of funds for many programs ranging from technology to renovation work.

 

In 2006, Secaida D. Howell was nearly the 10th superintendent in as many years to lead Bamberg School District Two in Denmark, S.C. He inherited antiquated policies, teacher certifications falling through the cracks, and waning student achievement.

When Tim Marquez graduated from Abraham Lincoln High School in the Denver Public Schools, he was clueless on how to get college scholarships. He eventually attended the Colorado School of Mines, where he received a degree in petroleum engineering and became highly successful.

In 2006, he decided to give back to his city by establishing a $50 million challenge grant (it meets every dollar that Denver schools raise) to provide every needy student who applies with a scholarship of up to $6,000 for as long as five years to any Colorado-based university.

Schools and districts that serve a large number of English language learners (ELL s) have found it helpful to develop a comprehensive program that addresses the specific needs of the population they serve. But what about districts that experience a sudden influx of ELL students? In these places, no ELL program may be in place, and existing staff may not be trained or experienced in teaching students whose first language is not English.

 

As our schools face draconian budgets cuts, there are two critical ways in which Washington can help: by investing in our schools and by harnessing the insight and will of our educators.

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