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Articles: Assessment

Increasing awareness for educators is critical. Here are seven things to know.

How young people who age out of foster care can help current students.

Districts are building supports for students in foster care—from raising awareness, providing PD and creating special programs to adding specialized staff and even running permanent group homes.

When Rio Grande City Consolidated ISD introduced a digital reading program two years ago, some teachers balked at student assessments being performed by a computer. Those concerns abated as teachers saw increased proficiency for the 4,100 students using Istation Reading and Istation Español, says Serapio Trillayes, executive director for curriculum and instruction for the district, which is located in South Texas, near the Mexican border.

Better Together, a book about personalized and project-based learning, profiles school networks and shares proven teaching models, ideas for more effective collaborations and strategies for optimizing education networks.

Dwayne Copeland was named the 2018 elementary school principal of the year by Florida's Volusia County School District and the FUTURES Foundation.

After raising the grade during his first year at Edith I. Starke Elementary School, Principal Dwayne Copeland maintained the C average for three years by creating a PTA and by adding field trips to school offerings. 

The percentage of kindergartners in West Valley School District #208 ready for math compared to kindergartners in Washington state.

A student success program at West Valley School District #208 in Yakima, Washington, provides additional support for learners from pre-K through high school graduation.

Innovation expert Ted Dintersmith is the author of What School Could Be (Princeton University Press, 2018).

In his new book What School Could Be, innovation expert Ted Dintersmith profiles schools that focus on innovation and “real” learning, rather than endlessly drilling on formulas and definitions that don’t matter in today’s world.

Ron Huberman was the CEO and superintendent for Chicago Public Schools and now works with Chicago area law enforcement.

The more engaged teachers are in their own growth as educators, the better students will fare. Here’s how to give teachers a voice in their professional learning journey.

1. Server room to classroom—Expand your focus from maintaining networks and hardware to helping choose instructional software.

2. Gearhead to gear guide—Fix devices and show teachers and students how to use them.

3. Tech provider to tech trimmer—Assess what programs and applications drive student achievement.

4. Data generator to data analyzer—Provide easy-to-read reports from various platforms so administrators and teachers can quickly assess student progress.

Districts moving aggressively into personalized learning covet IT leaders who not only understand instruction, but who also have the technology chops to make decisions about devices and networks.

Developers of equity programs offer the following tips for success:

You need it first—Equity PD gets the best results when leaders—from superintendents to school board members to principals—are trained before their staff.

Dialogue, collaboration and role-play—Kids don’t love PowerPoints or lectures, and neither do educators. PD that gets teachers talking, collaborating and even role-playing seems to be most effective.

During Noel Petrosky’s 12 years at different Saint Marys Area School District elementary schools, she saw assessment data accurately predict student performance on state tests and inform instruction that led to student growth. That wasn’t the case at Saint Marys Area Middle School when she became principal two years ago.

“I thought, ‘I can’t go into a system not knowing what my students are capable of,’ ” recalls Petrosky, who wanted to establish a multi-tier system of supports (MTSS) framework at her middle school in rural northwestern Pennsylvania.

Twenty-six states have digital learning repositories where vetted, curated instructional content and material is available to all educators in the state.

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