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Articles: Student Conduct

Superintendent Pat Greco of School District of Menomonee Falls was named Wisconsin’s 2018 Superintendent of the Year by the Wisconsin Association of School District Administrators.

During Superintendent Pat Greco’s seven-year tenure, the School District of Menomonee Falls in Wisconsin has won a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Top Workplace award three years in a row.

Crafting a strong and well-balanced social media policy requires considerable time and effort. The policy must be flexible enough to accommodate new tech trends yet thorough and specific.

The zero-out-of-100 is just one of the traditional grading practices schools are rethinking as they seek to report student performance more accurately.

The U.S. Department of Education has until January to approve or deny Iowa’s plan. If approved, Iowa plans to conduct the survey annually beginning in spring 2018.

Iowa intends to survey students on school climate as part of its Every Student Succeeds (ESSA) accountability plan.

Schools connected to overseas U.S. military bases often try to restrict class sizes—to about 18 or 20 pupils—so teachers can develop closer relationships with their students.

A teacher’s primary obligation is to make sure newcomers integrate into their classes as quickly as possible, says Amy Peaceman, who recently retired after 41 years of teaching in Department of Defense schools.

Linda Cliatt-Wayman was assistant superintendent for all the high schools in Philadelphia before taking the role of principal at the notorious Strawberry Mansion High School.

As the principal who changed two low-performing and violent Philadelphia high schools into safe spaces focused on learning, Linda Cliatt-Wayman developed a program of high expectations.

Perhaps one of the more confusing aspects of teaching about religion is the question of whether students can pray in public schools.

The answer is yes, within established guidelines.

According to the American Civil Liberties Union:


Link to main story: Schools are teaching, not preaching

Nancy Willard is the director of Embrace Civility in the Digital Age.

What schools are trying to do to prevent bullying appears to have had almost no positive impact.

Lockdown drills can pose health hazards, says Dennis Lewis, president of Edu-Safe, a safety training firm.

Lewis, who spent 17 years as the public safety director for Springfield Public Schools in Missouri, shares the following best practices:

Connect instruction to safety. Rigid, step-by-step drills don’t encourage critical thinking, discussion or variations. Educators can develop lessons that, for example, encourage students to think about wider safety issues and teamwork.

Across the country, schools are weighing the pros and cons of practicing worst-case scenario drills without unduly traumatizing students, staff and the community.

GUIDING LIGHT—Principal Marc Martin greets students at Commodore John Rodgers School, a K8 building in Baltimore. Educators at the school, which has achieved a dramatic turnaround in performance, are now mentoring their counterparts at three of the city’s most troubled schools.

Three chronically underperforming Baltimore City Public Schools are now getting intensive, hands-on guidance from educators at a fourth district school that has achieved a dramatic turnaround.

OFFERING INSIGHT—Students at Saint Louis Public Schools work on tablets. The district is using technology to share student academic and behavioral data with parents in real-time.

More than a decade after Response-to-Intervention and Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) took root on school campuses across the country, multi-tier strategies have become the standard for identifying and assisting struggling students.

District leaders and experts weigh in on the four steps to having a successful intervention.

Matt Miller is the new superintendent of Lakota Local Schools in Ohio.

Matt Miller, new superintendent of Ohio’s Lakota Local Schools, is reaching community members with his social media savviness.

The future of fidget spinners remains uncertain for the 2017-18 school year. (Gettyimages.com: J2R).

Whirling fidget spinners invaded classrooms across the country this past spring, but with many schools banning them as a distraction, their future as a potential remedy for students with attention difficulties is in doubt.

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