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Articles: Language Arts

Ramon Namnun is principal of the High School of World Cultures, one of three schools housed in the James Monroe Educational Complex in the Bronx, offering instruction for new arrival students within New York City Public Schools.

Incorporating high-quality resources to support ELL students can have a stark impact on whether they succeed. At High School of World Cultures, we have been able to pinpoint four best practices for evaluating ELL resources.

The Administration for Native Americans says that, of the 245 indigenous languages in the U.S., about 65  are extinct and 75 are near extinction. (Gettyimages.com: mvp64).

The Department of Education has begun accepting applications for $2.3 million in grants that will teach Native American languages to a new generation of children.

3D printers have become necessary devices in classrooms in all subjects. Students who have mastered this technology are in high demand in a wide range of professions.(Gettyimages.com: monkeybusinessimages).

From kindergarten to senior year, from basic problem-solving to career prep, 3D printers have become instructional backbones coast to coast.

Districts and community organizations now provide transportation, meals, summer lessons and family activities to prepare children for kindergarten reading.

“Growth mindset” is the increasingly popular learning approach in which K12 leaders affirm their students’—and their staff members’—lifelong capacity to boost intelligence.

Without the right intervention tools, it is nearly impossible to turn a struggling reader into a successful reader. But with the right program, combined with effective teaching strategies, extensive gains for struggling readers in comprehension, fluency, and spelling are attainable in any district.

FINDING THEIR VOICES—Students from the New Haven Urban Debate League in Connecticut are among those across the nation who have been learning the speaking and presentation skills necessary for productive public engagement.

A number of schools nationwide are committed to teaching skills coaches say will last a lifetime, including how to maintain eye contact and ask meaningful questions.

Takeaways from the 2018 ‘What’s Hot in Literacy’ report

More than 2,000 educators from 91 countries and territories responded to the most recent survey from the International Literacy Association, targeting the most important issues in literacy.

We are entrusted with creating opportunities for all students to achieve their highest potential. Anyone can relate to this basic need: to be understood for our abilities, not categorized by our challenges. Let’s defy the stereotypes and see students for their potential, not their inability to read; let’s empower each teacher to change lives; let’s recognize each district for its ability to build a better literacy program.

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ducators in Bradley County Schools in Cleveland, Tennessee, were faced with some staggering numbers: 48 percent of third-grade students were reading on grade level. That meant five out of every 10 were not.

“We were above the state average of 43 percent,” says Terri Murray, supervisor of Federal Programs/Media Services for the district where 10 of 11 K-5 schools are Title I. “But still, 48 was not good enough for us.”

As of January 2017, of the 46 states that originally adopted the Common Core, eight had officially repealed or withdrawn, and 17 had not yet made any changes.(Gettyimages.com: gjohnstonphoto).

In September, New York’s Board of Regents voted to revise the standards and drop the Common Core name in favor of “Next Generation Learning Standards.”

With U.S. businesses of all sizes competing on the global stage, foreign language classes—and the teachers who teach them—are vanishing from K12 schools.

Only about 10 percent of the U.S. population speaks a language other than English proficiently, and just 15 percent of public elementary schools offer language instruction, according to The American Academy of Arts and Science.

An innovative arts program in Connecticut allows students to study art alongside visiting Chinese students and collaborate in ways that allow a deeper appreciation for art from both cultures.

East High School students in the Rochester City School District recently earned the opportunity to send their microgravity experiment to the International Space Station.

Districts faced with hard-to-fill vacancies—in math, science and bilingual education, among other subjects—look for candidates abroad, often with help from recruiting agencies

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