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Articles: STEM

What are the key components of a successful STEAM education initiative?

Where should schools start when it comes to implementing technology?

STEAM learning—which incorporates art and design thinking into the traditional STEM subjects—is becoming increasingly adopted as educators seek to inspire more creativity, problem-solving skills, collaboration and critical thinking in their students. Educators in the Maury County Public Schools in Tennessee began pursuing their mission to blend project-based learning and STEM subjects with art and design in 2015. The end result was the creation of the Mt. Pleasant Arts Innovation Zone, the first preK-14 STEAM campus in the U.S.

In the U.S., the majority of adults who both do and don't work in STEM-related field say they like science and math, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center.

More STEM workers (66 percent) have said they like these subjects, however, than non-STEM workers (45 percent).


Link to main story: Sounds of STEM education

With just over 100 K12 students and the closest 1,000-student district nearly 100 miles away, Colorado’s Arickaree School District utilizes e-learning technology to create virtual classrooms.

In particular, it collaborates in synchronous online learning with the 1,800-student STEM School Highlands Ranch near Denver.


Link to main story: Sounds of STEM education

A lot of science goes into building a great acoustic guitar. For example, students must analyze malleability, weight and other composition factors when picking the wood to make their own instrument.

GET YOUR MOTOR RUNNIN’—A typical class at  Tahoma High involves students working on separate machines, including a tire balancer. Instructor Luke Thompson also provides writing assignments. Documenting work, he says, is an industry standard for tasks such as repair orders.

Schools have started fine-tuning their automotive tech programs to make them ideal vehicles for STEM instruction.

Towson University’s Educycle program teams college students with high school interns to clean, run diagnostics on and redistribute ‘old’ computers. Refurbished devices go to Towson’s student labs and to local Baltimore County, Harford County and Baltimore City school districts, who then install new software and operating systems.

PLANTING THE SEEDS OF STEM—Students at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute grow plants treated with fertilizer created in the school’s own aquaponic lab.

Fertilizing “floating” plants with nitrogen-rich fish feces provides real-life chemistry, biology and engineering lessons to high school students working in Baltimore Polytechnic Institute’s aquaponic laboratory.

Michael Lauro is associate executive director of the Atlantis Charter School.

There is a disconnect between what students know when they leave high school and what they are expected to know when they enter college and the workplace. So, how do you prevent this disconnect?

Math instruction continues to move further into digital territory, but many lessons still depend on hands-on activities and nondigital materials, such as textbooks.

Jerrod Wheeler is superintendent of Knob Noster Public Schools in Missouri.

Every professional at Knob Noster Public Schools takes seriously our role in educating children of our armed forces.

Tracking: EDU—Education Agency Website Security and Privacy Practices, EdTech Strategies, DAmag.me/tredu

 More than half of state departments of education lack key security and privacy protections for users, according to a recent state-by-state survey by EdTech Strategies, a technology consulting firm. 

12 states offer no HTTPS—or secure site—support

3 states have errors in certificates that guarantee website connection security


Link to main story: Real-world projects guide magnet school students

BUILDING A BETTER VEST—Students at Fairchild Wheeler Interdistrict Multi-Magnet school engineer bulletproof vests as part  of a project-based curriculum.

Real-world passion projects inspired magnet school students in Bridgeport, Connecticut, to design sturdier bulletproof vests and faster sails, among other innovations.

Finding innovative ways to make math matter to students is key to improving competency in all grades.

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