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Articles: STEM

GET YOUR MOTOR RUNNIN’—A typical class at  Tahoma High involves students working on separate machines, including a tire balancer. Instructor Luke Thompson also provides writing assignments. Documenting work, he says, is an industry standard for tasks such as repair orders.

Schools have started fine-tuning their automotive tech programs to make them ideal vehicles for STEM instruction.

Towson University’s Educycle program teams college students with high school interns to clean, run diagnostics on and redistribute ‘old’ computers. Refurbished devices go to Towson’s student labs and to local Baltimore County, Harford County and Baltimore City school districts, who then install new software and operating systems.

PLANTING THE SEEDS OF STEM—Students at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute grow plants treated with fertilizer created in the school’s own aquaponic lab.

Fertilizing “floating” plants with nitrogen-rich fish feces provides real-life chemistry, biology and engineering lessons to high school students working in Baltimore Polytechnic Institute’s aquaponic laboratory.

Michael Lauro is associate executive director of the Atlantis Charter School.

There is a disconnect between what students know when they leave high school and what they are expected to know when they enter college and the workplace. So, how do you prevent this disconnect?

Math instruction continues to move further into digital territory, but many lessons still depend on hands-on activities and nondigital materials, such as textbooks.

Jerrod Wheeler is superintendent of Knob Noster Public Schools in Missouri.

Every professional at Knob Noster Public Schools takes seriously our role in educating children of our armed forces.

Tracking: EDU—Education Agency Website Security and Privacy Practices, EdTech Strategies, DAmag.me/tredu

 More than half of state departments of education lack key security and privacy protections for users, according to a recent state-by-state survey by EdTech Strategies, a technology consulting firm. 

12 states offer no HTTPS—or secure site—support

3 states have errors in certificates that guarantee website connection security


Link to main story: Real-world projects guide magnet school students

BUILDING A BETTER VEST—Students at Fairchild Wheeler Interdistrict Multi-Magnet school engineer bulletproof vests as part  of a project-based curriculum.

Real-world passion projects inspired magnet school students in Bridgeport, Connecticut, to design sturdier bulletproof vests and faster sails, among other innovations.

Finding innovative ways to make math matter to students is key to improving competency in all grades.

Two years ago, the Mehlville School District in suburban St. Louis passed a tax levy that included dedicated funding for professional development and strategic plans focusing on middle school STEM programs. For Tina Plummer, assistant superintendent for teaching and learning in Mehlville, that meant implementing the STEM Innovator program with Discovery Education, where staff had ongoing professional development and coaching focused on STEM education and career opportunities.

The spread of learning on mobile devices has driven providers to push science platforms into the cloud.

Students in seventh-grade math classes are not necessarily ready for seventh-grade math. They may be rusty in concepts taught in sixth grade, or ready for high-level applications covered in high school.

That is why the ALEKS® personalized learning program from McGraw-Hill Education is an integral part of the math curriculum in Oak Creek-Franklin middle schools, says Annalee Bennin, director of curriculum and assessment for the southeastern Wisconsin district.

REACHING AT-RISK STUDENTS—Through Berkeley Township’s Project Reach, at-risk students can participate in Camp Paw, a summer program that provides extra learning opportunities, including reading and STEM activities.

A combination of grants, donations, and discounted materials and services from the community led to the creation of Berkeley Township School District's Project Reach program for at-risk students.

Repurposing buses no longer suitable for daily transportation has provided schools with mobile makerspaces, traveling cafés and bookmobiles.

A new movement that promises closer cooperation between higher ed and K12 aims to end this legacy of passing the buck.

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