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Articles: STEM

Kathleen Regan came to Glen Rock Public Schools four years ago thinking she would work only six months as the interim director of curriculum and instruction. Instead, she has stayed and succeeded—helping place the affluent, 2,500-student New Jersey district 20 miles northwest of Manhattan in the national spotlight for its science, technology, engineering and math program that extends from kindergarten to college-level work in high school.

PROBLEM

Maryland’s high school assessment (HSA) exams indicated that students in Prince George’s County Public Schools learning STEM subjects were not as prepared for graduation as their statewide counterparts. Just sixty-five percent of first-time takers passed the state’s Biology HSA, indicating a disconnect between the content and the skills and processes portions of the exam. Secondary science instructional specialist Godfrey Rangasammy felt that students were having a difficult time making interdisciplinary connections and interpreting science data they were learning.

 

With computers and interactive whiteboards becoming more prevalent in classrooms, districts are looking for tools to help maximize the technology's benefits and improve educational results.

Inspiring kids to pursue STEM education is more than just a good idea—the economic viability of our country's future nearly depends on it. A new Web video series, Advanced Technological Education Television (ATETV), does just this by showing students where their interests in math and science can lead them in terms of a college education and careers. Supported with a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program began by partnering with community colleges nationwide and teaming up with technological industry employers.

 

Educators at Sweetwater High School in National City, Calif., found themselves in a bind a few years ago. The school had been designated a "Program Improvement" institution under the No Child Left Behind Act, so changes had to be made.

 

At Hillsborough County Public Schools in Tampa, Fla., college readiness is a districtwide goal for all students. With a diverse mix of over 190,000 students, the nation's eighth-largest school district turned to the College Board for help.

 

<a href=#HAWAII>Hawaii Fourth-Graders revive storied site</a>

 

Dear Educator:

I invite you to participate in the upcoming Disney's Planet Challenge, a hands-on, environmental learning experience for grades 3-8.

 

What is Disney's Planet Challenge?

Disney's Planet Challenge is a free, project-based environmental and science competition for grades 3-8 that encourages students to make a difference in their schools, their communities and at home.

 

The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) plays an important role in ensuring that Disney's Planet Challenge conforms to rigorous educational standards and appeals to the widest range of teachers and students.

The gulf drilling explosion on the Deepwater Horizon caused an unprecedented disaster that left experts scrambling to discover the elusive solution that will halt the unceasing flow of pollutants. The question remains: How do we prevent this kind of disaster from happening again? The most sustainable and forward-thinking answer may lie in education. It is within the academic realm of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), often touted as the Achilles' heel of the U.S. educational system, that the foundations for future disaster-aversion could be built.

As the nation prepares for common core standards in math and English language arts, a framework to guide new science standards in elementary and secondary education—where students are showing only mediocre achievement compared to other nations—is getting closer.

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