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Articles: Data

Trent Tursi is Director of Digital Transformation at CompuCom.

Educators and administrators struggle every day to effectively incorporate emergent technologies within their buildings and classrooms. Outdated systems and legacy network infrastructure impede the ability of modernization and digital transformation initiatives to improve the level of safety, collaboration and efficiency within our schools.

In this webinar, a CompuCom Education presenter outlined how to build a foundation for scalable, emergent technology to foster greater collaboration in schools, and how intelligent automation can ensure a more safe and secure environment.

What are some ways technology is increasing personal learning?

We are seeing a significant digital transformation. Mobility, cloud, storage, faster networks and innovative device form factors are combining to create a major change in how technology can be used in the classroom. The confluence of Common Core, E-rate policy, digital curriculum and tech innovation that began six years ago has accelerated.

School administrators must assess their policies and practices on collecting, managing and sharing student data, both digitally and on paper, and clearly explain these efforts to parents.

From left to right: Serapio Trillayes, Executive Director of Curriculum and Instruction, Rio Grande City CISD (Texas); Karen Ingram, National Education Consultant, Istation

There are a variety of steps that administrators can take to create a data-driven district culture that will help teachers use the right data in the right way to address the diverse learning needs of students and lead powerful learning outcomes across schools.

Most current assessment systems rely on generating data in order to identify, sort and label students, as well as educators. But this approach is at odds with what has always been the true purpose of effective assessment, which should instead be to build hope, efficacy and achievement for both learners and educators.

Source: 2016-17 Digital School District Survey

School districts use data dashboards for student performance, student information system administration view, IT systems and services, break/fix support, mid-course assessments, and financials/budgeting.

Trish Rubin is a marketing instructor at Baruch College in New York and is the author of BrandED: Tell Your Story, Build Relationships, and Empower Learning.

How two schools gathered data to help build their brands and more effectively tell their stories. 

From left to right: Kay Benning, Director of Library Services, Elmbrook Schools (Wis.); Edwin Tucker, Account Manager, OverDrive Education.

Digital reading platforms can enable more personalized learning by providing engaging, interactive and customizable digital content to both students and educators in all subject areas, as well as supplemental curriculum materials, professional development resources, ELL and special education titles, and more.

When securing edtech infrastructure, district leaders must concentrate on six layers of security—physical, network, applications, content, endpoint and cloud/data centers—to build a comprehensive defense against increasing and evolving cyberattacks.

Eileen Belastock is chief technology officer for Mount Greylock Regional School District in Massachusetts.

Voice-activated tools can create more immersive learning experiences, but school leaders need to consider the potential privacy risks and to safeguard student data.

When Rio Grande City Consolidated ISD introduced a digital reading program two years ago, some teachers balked at student assessments being performed by a computer. Those concerns abated as teachers saw increased proficiency for the 4,100 students using Istation Reading and Istation Español, says Serapio Trillayes, executive director for curriculum and instruction for the district, which is located in South Texas, near the Mexican border.

What does the routing process look like at First Student?

During Noel Petrosky’s 12 years at different Saint Marys Area School District elementary schools, she saw assessment data accurately predict student performance on state tests and inform instruction that led to student growth. That wasn’t the case at Saint Marys Area Middle School when she became principal two years ago.

“I thought, ‘I can’t go into a system not knowing what my students are capable of,’ ” recalls Petrosky, who wanted to establish a multi-tier system of supports (MTSS) framework at her middle school in rural northwestern Pennsylvania.

Why is personalized learning so important?

Marcy: It leverages a student’s interests, their strengths, then tailors instruction to their specific needs and goals.

Rich: It gets into predictive analytics. Traditionally the analytics type of reporting is a look at what has been happening. Personalized learning is looking at what is going to happen.

Twenty-six states have digital learning repositories where vetted, curated instructional content and material is available to all educators in the state.

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