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Articles: Equity

Verletta White is interim superintendent of Baltimore County Public Schools.

Districts are increasingly tasked with providing options for at-risk and underserved student populations to address persistent achievement gaps.

A look back at the year’s top stories sheds some light on the way forward.

Bill Santarsiero is principal of Morris Street Elementary School in Danbury, Connecticut.

Under principal Bill Santarsiero’s leadership, Morris Street Elementary School became one of 30 schools nationwide to earn a National Blue Ribbon from the U.S. Department of Education for closing the achievement gap.

Source: Frontline Research and Learning Institute Survey 2017

A new report by the Frontline Research and Learning Institute sets out to provide actionable insights to help states and local districts address the needs of special needs students equitably.

Blane McCann is the superintendent of Westside Community Schools in Omaha, Nebraska.

Giftedness is not just a test score. How many students have we seen who did not have a test score to qualify for a gifted program but became an expert in an area of passion and interest?

The zero-out-of-100 is just one of the traditional grading practices schools are rethinking as they seek to report student performance more accurately.

The following districts recognize the benefits of a diverse workforce and have made it a priority. Take a look at some of their practices.

Dyslexia is not correlated with intelligence, says Richard Wagner, associate director of the Florida Center for Reading Research and a professor of psychology at Florida State University.

“If you’re reading at a level at which you do everything else, it’s probably not dyslexia,” Wagner says.

“If you’re reading below the level at which you do other things, it’s more likely to be dyslexia.”

Educators know that most dyslexic students will need interventions and accommodations throughout school, but best practices continue to evolve as more is learned about this reading disability.

Many states have enacted laws and guidelines spelling out how schools can help students with dyslexia.

Such laws vary by state.

According to understood.org, a website on learning and attention issues founded by 15 nonprofit organizations, they generally address issues such as:


Link to main story: How schools are disrupting dyslexia

Beverly Daniel Tatum is an authority on the psychology of racism and a retired president of Spelman College.

20 years after Beverly Daniel Tatum's landmark 1997 book Why Are All The Black Kids Sitting Together In The Cafeteria? was released, she is now back with a fully revised edition.

Schools connected to overseas U.S. military bases often try to restrict class sizes—to about 18 or 20 pupils—so teachers can develop closer relationships with their students.

A teacher’s primary obligation is to make sure newcomers integrate into their classes as quickly as possible, says Amy Peaceman, who recently retired after 41 years of teaching in Department of Defense schools.

Military-connected students—compared to civilian classmates—have moderately elevated rates of just about all risk factors, including suicidal thoughts, substance abuse and bullying.

The federal Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) allows districts in low-income areas to serve free breakfast and lunch to students without collecting household applications. (Gettyimages.com: asiseelt).

The New York City Department of Education announced in September that all public school students will now receive free lunch. 

Wealthy schools can raise eye-popping amounts from fundraising that add to the opportunities for well-off students, while the neediest schools struggle to keep up.

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