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Articles: Standards

Dan Hamlin is a postdoctoral fellow in the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

Dan Hamlin, a postdoctoral fellow in the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and Paul E. Petersen have examined data to see what impact states lowering the bar on academic proficiency have had on student achievement.

Just a few years ago, Title I students in Hoover City Schools were making such modest gains that they stayed in the program year after year.

That all changed once the central Alabama district implemented Istation, an e-learning program that identifies learning gaps and provides engaging interactive lessons and face-to-face teaching strategies to get students back on track.

Implemented in Hoover City in the fall of 2015, it is used in Response to Intervention (RTI) for students in grades 1 through 5 in the district’s four Title I schools.

When Wicomico County Public Schools implemented common core state standards six years ago, complaints from parents rolled in regarding challenging homework assignments. 

“Parents did not understand so they couldn’t help their children,” explains Julie Dill, elementary math supervisor for the 15,000-student district on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

Then came Everyday Mathematics 4, a comprehensive math program that enables parents to access lessons and watch videos at home to break down the common core language barrier.

GET YOUR MOTOR RUNNIN’—A typical class at  Tahoma High involves students working on separate machines, including a tire balancer. Instructor Luke Thompson also provides writing assignments. Documenting work, he says, is an industry standard for tasks such as repair orders.

Schools have started fine-tuning their automotive tech programs to make them ideal vehicles for STEM instruction.

Here’s how schools and districts overcome six potential pitfalls after adopting self-paced learning.

Sam Frenzel is a writer for Teach.com based in upstate New York. He covers topics including education policy, teacher welfare and classroom technology.

Many teachers are forced into using technology they are unfamiliar or uncomfortable using. Administrators should do all they can to help teachers overcome this. Here are four keys to supporting and engaging teachers.

Daniel Koretz, one of the nation’s foremost experts on education testing, is the Henry Lee Shattuck professor of education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and author of "The Testing Charade: Pretending to Make Schools Better."

In The Testing Charade: Pretending to Make Schools Better, Daniel Koretz says the pressure to raise achievement test scores often leads to outright cheating.

Source: “States Leading for Equity: Promising Practices Advancing the Equity Commitments,” 2018;  The Council of Chief State School Officers, America’s Promise Alliance  and The Aspen Institute; DAmag.me/ccsso

In 2016, state education leaders, advocates and civil rights leaders gathered together to develop actions to support education equity. A year later, 10 general equity-boosting practices have emerged from across the U.S. 

Most state standards fail to include meaningful requirements for learning about slavery. (GerryImages.com)

Schools fail to adequately teach the history of American slavery, partly because teachers lack the preparation to cover it, according to a recent study from the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Doug Green has been an educator since 1970, serving as an elementary principal, district computer director, K12 science chair, high school chemistry and physics teacher, and adjunct professor.

In his book, Teaching Isn’t Rocket Science, It’s Way More Complex, Doug Green examines everything from flipped classrooms, standardized testing to special education.

More than half of the states have earned passing marks for developing financially literate students, but nearly 30 percent of states scored a D or worse.

Grant Lichtman, a former administrator, is the author of Moving the Rock, a book that outlines seven “levers” to help schools or districts introduce a “deeper learning” model.

In Grant Lichtman's book, Moving the Rock, the former administrator outlines seven “levers” that schools or districts can use to begin to pry that rock free and introduce a “deeper learning” model.

At the fast-growing Manor Independent School District located outside of Austin, Texas, over 38 percent of students are English language learners. These students are expected to master the same standards as their native English-speaking peers. Meredith Roddy, Director of Bilingual and ESL Programs, is tasked with closing the achievement gap between ELL students and native English-speaking students.

“I think of it as an opportunity,” says Roddy. “It’s about finding the right resources to engage ELL students with language and content area learning.”

Thousands of science teachers around the country are incorporating standards that include the study of climate change. But other educators have found that one of the first questions to answer is exactly how to deliver the lessons.

Leanne E. Oliver is a mathematics teacher and curriculum chair at Monsignor John Pereyma Catholic Secondary School in Oshawa, Ontario.

High-quality, collaborative, professional development for teachers is a difference-maker for students. I have witnessed firsthand its power as a teacher and mathematics curriculum chair at Monsignor John Pereyma Catholic Secondary School in Oshawa, Ontario.

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