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Articles: Standards

Rui Dionisio is superintendent of the Verona Public Schools in New Jersey.

Implementing inquiry-based science is one approach to developing critical thinking and personalizing instruction for students by addressing the preconceptions that they bring with them to the classroom.

The zero-out-of-100 is just one of the traditional grading practices schools are rethinking as they seek to report student performance more accurately.

The damage to teaching and learning caused by over-reliance on standardized tests is widely acknowledged. It includes narrowed curricula, teaching to the test, and one-size-fits-all instruction. The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) offers a significant opportunity for states and districts to revamp their assessment systems.

Little Falls City School District’s standards-based Engineering by Design program strives to build students’ resilience while developing their real-life problem-solving skills.

IBM’s Watson computing system identifies the academic prerequisites and standards mapped out for each lesson. (Gettyimages.com: just_super).

IBM’s Watson computing system—perhaps the world’s most well-known artificial intelligence technology—now provides K5 educators with a database of open educational math resources.

The Illinois State Board of Education will determine each district’s financial status before distributing funds, in light of the revamping of state education funding. (Gettyimages.com: frankramspott).

Illinois has revamped state education funding to provide extra support to economically challenged K12 districts.

As of January 2017, of the 46 states that originally adopted the Common Core, eight had officially repealed or withdrawn, and 17 had not yet made any changes.(Gettyimages.com: gjohnstonphoto).

In September, New York’s Board of Regents voted to revise the standards and drop the Common Core name in favor of “Next Generation Learning Standards.”

Curious to know what you can and cannot teach in a religious studies class in primary, middle, and secondary schools?

You can find a few resources below.

The First Amendment Center offers an extensive collection of papers, books and other materials for educators to know what they can and cannot do, by law, in public schools.


Link to main story: Schools are teaching, not preaching

CONTENT CHECK—Jodi Ide, a teacher at Brighton High School in Utah,  says  parents have never complained about  the content in her world religion class—and no students have ever changed faiths. (Deseret News / Laura Seitz).

Teaching about religion is not only permissible, but is gaining traction as a way to promote greater understanding in a world of conflicting dogmas.

ROBOTS MAKE STEM FUN—A St. Vrain Valley high school student takes part in the rigorous STEM program that helps him attain future options, including more relevant job skills once he graduates college, or even high school.

At least five states, including Ohio, Nevada, New York and Texas, offer special endorsements for high school graduates who demonstrate strong achievement in STEM.

Teachers across the country are creating their own more sophisticated formative assessments and using adaptive learning software to generate real-time information on how each of their students are performing.

In just the last few months, several districts and states have eliminated tests and cut assessment time to make room for instruction and reduce stress.

Superintendents who want to reduce testing time should perform an assessment audit, says Bob Schaeffer, public education director at the National Center for Fair & Open Testing.


Link to main article: States begin shedding standardized tests in K12

Passing the University of Cambridge's Cambridge Primary curriculum culminates with an Advanced International Certificate of Education, recognized by colleges and universities around the world. (Gettyimages.com: chrisdorney).

Florida’s Collier County school district will use the Cambridge Primary curriculum, which was developed by the University of Cambridge, in every one of its 29 elementary schools.

Nearly 315 religions and denominations exist in the U.S. alone. (Gettyimages.com: peterhermesfurian).

The National Council for the Social Studies this past June released new guidelines for teaching religion in schools.

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