You are here

Articles: Social-Emotional Learning

Districts and community organizations now provide transportation, meals, summer lessons and family activities to prepare children for kindergarten reading.

Children from 19 El Paso ISD schools now engage in social-emotional activities at nearly two dozen new playgrounds, thanks in part to districtwide communication.

Educators and psychologists propose a host of explanations for the apparent uptick in student anxiety. Some point to public events – terrorism, school shootings, opioid addiction, the coarsening of political discourse in the age of Trump.

Others blame technology—devices that substitute electronic contact for face-to-face interaction, and social media that transform school-hours drama into a 24-7 preoccupation.

Still others look to family dysfunction, or pressure to match parental achievements. “The anxiety comes from so many different sources.

the best medicine—A “laughter yoga” session reduces student stress in the West Windsor-Plainsboro Regional School District in New Jersey. The district has also provided PD to show teachers how to conduct meditation and breathing exercises to ease their own and students’ anxiety.

Across the country, districts are grappling with rising levels of student anxiety attributed to everything from academic pressures to larger social forces. 

Source: “States Leading for Equity: Promising Practices Advancing the Equity Commitments,” 2018;  The Council of Chief State School Officers, America’s Promise Alliance  and The Aspen Institute; DAmag.me/ccsso

In 2016, state education leaders, advocates and civil rights leaders gathered together to develop actions to support education equity. A year later, 10 general equity-boosting practices have emerged from across the U.S. 

After February’s deadly school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, there was no shortage of suggestions for improving school security, ranging from adding more guards to arming teachers.

Jerrod Wheeler is superintendent of Knob Noster Public Schools in Missouri.

Every professional at Knob Noster Public Schools takes seriously our role in educating children of our armed forces.

How does children’s play behavior on school and community playgrounds contribute to physical, social, emotional and cognitive development?

DA's annual Outlook issue features snapshots from superintendents, curriculum directors, principals, teachers and other educators who weigh in on how their day-to-day roles and responsibilities are evolving. (Gettyimages.com: exdez).

The 2018 installment of DA’s annual Outlook issue gives prominence to the voices of educators and experts who share the solutions that are emerging across the country.

Clockwise from top left: Brian Eschbacher, Brisa Ayub, Theresa Morris, Jennifer Abrams, Kirk Langer, Kate Walsh, Rene Islas, Tamara Fyke, Amy Klinger, Matthew Emerson

What should happen and what will happen in various areas of education over the next few years elicits different answers from educators and from other experts.

Military-connected students—compared to civilian classmates—have moderately elevated rates of just about all risk factors, including suicidal thoughts, substance abuse and bullying.

At Hamilton Southeastern School District, Michael Beresford is assistant superintendent of staff and student services and Brooke Lawson is district mental health coordinator.

District Mental Health Coordinator Brooke Lawson and Assistant Superintendent of Staff and Student Services Michael Beresford discuss the challenges of addressing mental health issues.

In Districts of Distinction, honored districts from 23 states were chosen for the national recognition program for their innovative and unique twist on traditional programs.

From providing a range of innovative initiatives, including social-emotional learning programs to giving English language learners quality support, 54 school districts have been named among DA’s newest batch of Districts of Distinction this year.

In a soon-to-be-released study of eighth-graders in seven states, results reveal that game-based learning can not only engage students, leading them to perform better on assessments, but it can be easily incorporated into lessons.

In a classroom in New Hampshire, second-graders pull out iPads to film themselves discussing the characters of a book they are reading.

Pages