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BOOKSTORE BROWSING—Nearly 60 of Baltimore County Public Schools’ libraries have reorganized shelves to emulate bookstores, with books grouped by genre rather than the Dewey Decimel System. Students find it easier to help themselves.

School libraries increasingly use “genrefication”—the reorganization of collections by genre as opposed to the traditional Dewey Decimal System—to boost circulation.

AND YOU GET A CAR!—Madison Wilson, a 2017 graduate of West Creek High School, was excited to realize she was the winner of the AP Pass and Go! car last summer. Given the choice of three different models, she drove away in a Toyota Yaris. ( Brittany Persun, CMCSS).

Students at Clarksville-Montgomery County School System can win a brand-new Toyota Yaris, Hyundai Accent or Kia Rio—or other prizes, such as gift cards—if they score a 3 or higher on exams.

VARSITY VIDEO GAMES—E-sports teams—such as the squad pictured above at Nobesville High School in Indiana—often appeal to smart and creative students who have not participated previously in school activities, teacher Donald Wettrick says.

Dozens of high schools across the nation are adding competitive video-gaming as it becomes one of the fastest-growing activities in both K12 and higher ed.

Every school district in North Dakota should reach 1 gigabit per second of connectivity by summer 2019. For some, that could mean a tenfold increase.

The 100-gigabit upgrade to North Dakota’s statewide STAGEnet network will also provide faster service for higher education institutions and governments.

The state’s core network and internet capacity will see a 150 to 200 percent increase.

Jeremy Bailenson, head of Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, has provided tips on how to safely use virtual reality devices. 

One piece of advise that Bailenson included in his report is if students are using room-scale VR, then they should explore the room first with their virtual goggles on before the simulation starts.


Link to main story: K12 students visit the VR farm

VIRTUAL FIELD TRIP—Students at urban schools can tour The Farm Sanctuary in upstate New York courtesy of an interactive VR program that includes 360-degree video.

City students from both coasts have donned headsets to take virtual field trips wherein they learn about the humane treatment of farm animals on a rural sanctuary in upstate New York.

3D printers have become necessary devices in classrooms in all subjects. Students who have mastered this technology are in high demand in a wide range of professions.(Gettyimages.com: monkeybusinessimages).

From kindergarten to senior year, from basic problem-solving to career prep, 3D printers have become instructional backbones coast to coast.

Our analysis revealed 19 student and staff behaviors that are most likely to contribute to a positive school culture.

They are, in no particular order:


Link to main story: Schools can create positive climate in not-quite 20 steps

Tom Hierck is the author of Seven Keys to a Positive Learning Environment in Your Classroom. Kent Peterson is professor emeritus in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Many K12 leaders try to foster a more positive culture in their schools to teach and reinforce good behavior among students. But this raises some important questions.

Districts and community organizations now provide transportation, meals, summer lessons and family activities to prepare children for kindergarten reading.

Statewide teacher strikes and walkouts in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Arizona, Colorado and Kentucky left students out of school for days while superintendents scrambled.

Trish Rubin, former educator and now marketing consultant, wrote BrandED: Tell Your Story, Build Relationships and Empower Learning. Follow her at @trishrubin.

The “4 C’s” smart model is a tool for school brand builders who are on the path to “telling, not selling.”

Computational thinking covers more than learning how to code or even how to use computers. Rather, it teaches problem-solving techniques that draw heavily on logic, sequencing, and trial and error.

Matthew Mayer (pictured), along with Shane Jimerson, shaped a detailed, eight-point call to action to prevent gun violence in the U.S.. Several large school districts, among others, have signed on to support.

Matthew Mayer and Shane Jimerson shaped a detailed, eight-point call to action to prevent gun violence in the U.S.. Several large school districts, among others, have signed on to support.

“Growth mindset” is the increasingly popular learning approach in which K12 leaders affirm their students’—and their staff members’—lifelong capacity to boost intelligence.

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