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Lori Peek is the director of the Natural Hazards Center and professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Colorado Boulder. She co-authored Children of Katrina and most recently helped write FEMA guidelines for protecting schools against natural hazards.

Lori Peek, the director of the Natural Hazards Center and professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Colorado Boulder, recently helped write FEMA guidelines for protecting schools against natural hazards.

Certifications in the technology sector are ever-evolving, as new education tools, apps and platforms become available on a nearly continuous basis.

America’s economy and our public schools are inextricably linked. In Colorado, growth industries such as advanced manufacturing, information technology (IT) and aerospace have strengthened our economy and provided the foundation for innovation and investment in our communities. To continue supporting high levels of growth and success, we must ensure that our education system is preparing our children to meet the needs of an accelerated world.

In 2015, Raytown High School in Missouri created a much-needed class for its student leadership organization, Jay Crew, but the course still required a concrete curriculum. So the school adopted the Lead2Feed initiative, a free program of leadership lessons that students explore through activism in local or global communities in need.

For their first project, Jay Crew students led a food drive at a local grocery store for the Raytown Emergency Assistance Program, a local nonprofit. They raised $1,000 and collected 5,000 nonperishable food items.

The Administration for Native Americans says that, of the 245 indigenous languages in the U.S., about 65  are extinct and 75 are near extinction. (Gettyimages.com: mvp64).

The Department of Education has begun accepting applications for $2.3 million in grants that will teach Native American languages to a new generation of children.

A June study published in the Economics of Education Review says that shortening school weeks may cut costs for districts, but also increases the crime rates of students. (Gettyimages.com: pixomedesign).

Shortening school weeks may cut costs for districts, but the practice also increases student crime rates, according to a June study published in the Economics of Education Review.

Tiffany Anderson is superintendent of Topeka Public Schools.

Superintendent Tiffany Anderson, who lives more than 60 miles from her office, arrives at Topeka Public Schools every day at 5:30 a.m. and leaves at 7 p.m., so she can spend more time getting to know the district.

The latest technology can fill classrooms with movie theater-quality sound. Among the latest products are audio enhancers for videoconferences and speakers that can mount to various surfaces and generate sound from numerous devices. Students can add some constructive “noise” of their own with throwable microphones and online music platforms.

BOOKSTORE BROWSING—Nearly 60 of Baltimore County Public Schools’ libraries have reorganized shelves to emulate bookstores, with books grouped by genre rather than the Dewey Decimel System. Students find it easier to help themselves.

School libraries increasingly use “genrefication”—the reorganization of collections by genre as opposed to the traditional Dewey Decimal System—to boost circulation.

VARSITY VIDEO GAMES—E-sports teams—such as the squad pictured above at Nobesville High School in Indiana—often appeal to smart and creative students who have not participated previously in school activities, teacher Donald Wettrick says.

Dozens of high schools across the nation are adding competitive video-gaming as it becomes one of the fastest-growing activities in both K12 and higher ed.

AND YOU GET A CAR!—Madison Wilson, a 2017 graduate of West Creek High School, was excited to realize she was the winner of the AP Pass and Go! car last summer. Given the choice of three different models, she drove away in a Toyota Yaris. ( Brittany Persun, CMCSS).

Students at Clarksville-Montgomery County School System can win a brand-new Toyota Yaris, Hyundai Accent or Kia Rio—or other prizes, such as gift cards—if they score a 3 or higher on exams.

3D printers have become necessary devices in classrooms in all subjects. Students who have mastered this technology are in high demand in a wide range of professions.(Gettyimages.com: monkeybusinessimages).

From kindergarten to senior year, from basic problem-solving to career prep, 3D printers have become instructional backbones coast to coast.

VIRTUAL FIELD TRIP—Students at urban schools can tour The Farm Sanctuary in upstate New York courtesy of an interactive VR program that includes 360-degree video.

City students from both coasts have donned headsets to take virtual field trips wherein they learn about the humane treatment of farm animals on a rural sanctuary in upstate New York.

Jeremy Bailenson, head of Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, has provided tips on how to safely use virtual reality devices. 

One piece of advise that Bailenson included in his report is if students are using room-scale VR, then they should explore the room first with their virtual goggles on before the simulation starts.


Link to main story: K12 students visit the VR farm

Every school district in North Dakota should reach 1 gigabit per second of connectivity by summer 2019. For some, that could mean a tenfold increase.

The 100-gigabit upgrade to North Dakota’s statewide STAGEnet network will also provide faster service for higher education institutions and governments.

The state’s core network and internet capacity will see a 150 to 200 percent increase.

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