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From DA

"Se puede."

Like the crest of a wave that's been building slowly as it rolls toward shore, the high school reform movement broke in 2005. For years, elementary school education has been front and center for policymakers and advocates. But with a high-profile governors summit on high school reform last February, a mention in President Bush's State of the Union Address and new initiatives popping up from the federal level to school districts, high schools' time in the spotlight has arrived.

During a recent panel discussion I shared my discomfort with the topic of the digital divide. While concerns of equity are laudable, discussions of the digital divide are often little more than simplistic distractions. First, most student access to computers is meager and what's done with those computers is pedestrian. Even students in wealthy, well-equipped schools rarely experience the creative and intellectual potential afforded by computers.

She had no financial expertise--in fact, Veronica Klinefelt was a stay-at-home mom with a high school diploma when she won her bid for a seat on the East Detroit School Board in January 1998. But it was enough background to uncover a $3 million construction fraud scheme in her district that sent two board members and two superintendents to jail.

Drug dealing in American high schools can look as innocent as buying an ice cream cone. And that is exactly what happened in El Paso, Texas, last year.

An ice cream vendor decided to dish out another flavor last year in the student parking lot at Riverside High School in the Ysleta Independent School District, which borders Mexico, and this time it was Ganja ala Mode.

The legitimate ice cream vendor was handing out ice cream cones filled with marijuana to up to a dozen students every other day and administrators finally caught wind of it from an informant.

Creating a magazine is so different from reading a magazine, and even as I realize this, sometimes the gap between the two can be glaring.

More Women, Fewer White Males

Only 10 miles outside of Lincoln, Neb., far from the devastation that still haunts the Gulf Coast, Roy Baker feels the desperation of Hurricane Katrina's victims. It's impossible for him not to: this soft spoken yet determined superintendent of a school district so quaint in size its entire facility exists on one campus, Baker dealt with crisis first hand in May 2004 when a tornado swept through Norris County severely damaging most of what was in its path.

What do you get when you take seven strong school district leaders, add insight, wisdom and hard work?

Find out how these superintendents created a consortium, what they accomplish together and how you can follow suit.

Administrators across the nation have long recognized the need to focus efforts on attracting high quality teachers to their districts, especially those in low-performing, remote and inner-city schools. But after the teacher arrives at the school, then what?

The mission of a school is to facilitate learning. Learning depends on teachers, buildings, curriculum, materials, and, increasingly, security.

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