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From DA

Sitting in his one-story office in the town of Brandon, nestled among the Green Mountains of Vermont, William Mathis stares out his rain-splattered window as he contemplates education in the nation and his district, a few miles north of Rutland.

Quick--think special education. The typical district leader groans at high costs, paperwork and inefficiency. The assessment is frighteningly accurate, but a few districts are bucking the status quo by embracing technology.

When parents come to hear Ruth Parker of Mathematics Education Collaborative speak on quality mathematics education, they're expecting some answers. But what they may well get is a heavy dose of confusion and frustration.

06/2005

Ed Leaders Talk Tech

Unless every student is given his or her own computer in school, districts can't even be close to transforming education, according to one expert.

Text Demands on Students Don't Meet Life's Demands

Generally, the more frequently students change schools for reasons other than grade promotion, the more likely they are to have lower achievement and behavioral problems. They are also more likely to drop out. Research confirms this. So, if we could just convince families to stop moving around so much, we could increase student achievement, right?

First I saw the smoke, then the fire. In the alley stood a half dozen teens pitching books, notes and papers into a flaming trash can. I approached the group with the worry of a former principal to investigate.

While some studies suggest students want more connection between lessons and technology in the classroom, and that many teachers often struggle to accomplish this, the following books can help educators relate technology to students and improve achievement.

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