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Text Demands on Students Don't Meet Life's Demands

Generally, the more frequently students change schools for reasons other than grade promotion, the more likely they are to have lower achievement and behavioral problems. They are also more likely to drop out. Research confirms this. So, if we could just convince families to stop moving around so much, we could increase student achievement, right?

First I saw the smoke, then the fire. In the alley stood a half dozen teens pitching books, notes and papers into a flaming trash can. I approached the group with the worry of a former principal to investigate.

While some studies suggest students want more connection between lessons and technology in the classroom, and that many teachers often struggle to accomplish this, the following books can help educators relate technology to students and improve achievement.

Apple

Mac OS X version 10.4 "Tiger"

www.apple.com, Software, Single-user education license $69, Server version $249

For most education watchers, Connecticut's recent foray into the fight over No Child Left Behind began the moment state Commissioner of Education Betty J. Sternberg sent a letter to Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings. That letter asked, in part, that Connecticut receive a waiver to avoid the law's required annual tests.

Change Coming to No Child Left Behind

A fundamental change in how the Education Department enforces the No Child Left Behind act could affect the education of millions of students as states seek federal approval on everything from teacher quality to the measuring of student progress.

Lessons to Learn: U.S. vs. Singapore Math

When a particular country comes out on top for student achievement in a well-known international study, educators are bound to be talking about what that country might be doing right. But singing the praises of Singapore, which ranked first in the world in mathematics achievement in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study-2003, can really only begin when harmony is reached about what's being done in schools over there.

Monte Vista Elementary students are running in class. And jumping. And stretching. Teachers not only look on, but encourage the behavior. The 3-6 grade teachers are guiding students through targeted exercises and games as part of the Early Sport program, a research-driven fitness program that exemplifies 'new PE.'

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