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From DA

04/2005

Bush's Budget: Taking From Peter to Pay Paul?

Legislators Critical of Bush's Call to Expand NCLB

President Bush might not have the votes in Congress he needs to move forward on his a $1.5 billion proposal to expand the major tenets of No Child Left Behind to the nation's high schools.

Students to Help Unlock the Secrets of Longevity

Frank Wang knew he was green to the world of textbook publishing. "A few days after I defended my MIT thesis I literally got in my Honda and started driving to Oklahoma," he says. A top seat at Saxon Publishers, where Wang had helped out since high school, awaited him during that spring of 1991.

The idea of giving laptops to a large number of public students is officially entering its second phase. It has been almost four years since the big breakthrough, when Virginia's Henrico County Public Schools bought 23,000 iBooks for teachers and students.

Like a fine-tuned piece of machinery, districts across the nation are taking advantage of high-tech tools and software programs to collect reams of data on students, make sense of it all, and in the end, transfer that knowledge into successful classroom lessons.

New Gov. Infuriates Educators

Is Pay-off A Political Punching Bag?

Weeks after it was revealed the U.S. Department of Education paid a political pundit to talk up the No Child Left Behind law, errors in judgment have been acknowledge but the debate continues.

Tsunami Spurs Cross-Curricular Connections

With the camera rolling,17-year-old Lara Wilinsky faced an amiable-looking older couple. It was her first interview as a journalist, and Wilinsky wondered how exactly to ask about the night the couple's daughter was murdered.

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