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Jeremy Baugh, principal at Lew Wallace School 107 in Indianapolis, has implemented the Opportunity Culture initiative, where excellent teachers receive higher salaries to coach teams of educators.

ALTERNATE ROUTES—Students in a growing number of cities travel to class and other school activities via services such as Hop, Skip, Drive. The company hires parents and other caregivers as drivers.

The K12 transportation landscape is getting increasingly complex, as districts wrestle with issues ranging from school choice and questions of equity to how to subsidize mass transit for urban students.

A student's “hidden digital tattoo” is the information collected surreptitiously through browsers or social media profiles that may impact the ads and information they see online. (Gettyimages.com: altmodern).

As privacy concerns surge ever higher, some educators are pushing to replace the concept of “digital footprints”—the trail of data created by internet use—with “digital tattoos.”

Longtime educator Michael Niehoff writes on transformational leadership and professional development.

Here, a few superintendents elaborate on the advantages of blogging.

Janet Pittock, Director of Curriculum, McGraw-Hill Education

New approaches to elementary mathematics curriculum, instruction, technology and assessment are providing opportunities to personalize learning for each student, creating highly effective, student-centered learning environments.

In this web seminar, the director of curriculum at McGraw-Hill discussed ideas, strategies and resources for delivering a positive, measurable impact on student outcomes through personalized learning in K6 math instruction. 

Speaker

Janet Pittock
Director of Curriculum
McGraw-Hill Education

From left to right: Debra Walker Smith and the Hoover City Title I Team, Director of Federal Programs and Testing, Hoover City Schools (Ala.); Mitchelle Kelley, National Consultant, Istation

Holistic intervention strategies for Title I schools that coordinate efforts between all educators and stakeholders are crucial to improving achievement. Through focused professional development, incorporating research-based approaches and utilizing technology, intervention efforts at Title I schools can be the most effective.

From left to right: Luci Willits, Associate Vice President, Policy, Curriculum Associates; Kristopher John, Vice President, Online Assessment, Curriculum Associates; John Lovato, Ed.D., Assistant Superintendent, Educational Services, Rosemead School District (Calif.)

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires all Title I schools to use evidence-based educational activities. It is crucial that administrators understand not only how the law defines evidence-based, but also how to apply that definition to their decision-making process when selecting the resources that will meet their district’s needs.

This web seminar featured a discussion about the practical implications of ESSA for administrators, and how to analyze and apply education research to help make more effective strategic decisions in a district.

Ramon Namnun is principal of the High School of World Cultures, one of three schools housed in the James Monroe Educational Complex in the Bronx, offering instruction for new arrival students within New York City Public Schools.

Incorporating high-quality resources to support ELL students can have a stark impact on whether they succeed. At High School of World Cultures, we have been able to pinpoint four best practices for evaluating ELL resources.

What personal information is appropriate for teachers to share with their students? (Gettyimages.com: a-digit).

In fall 2017, an elementary school art teacher in Mansfield ISD in Arlington, Texas, introduced herself to her fourth-grade students with a slide show about her life. It included a photo of her partner, who the teacher presented as her future wife.

District leaders have enhanced credit recovery programs and have recommitted to proactive efforts to keep students from falling too far behind.

Project Unicorn does not leave data interoperability to the imagination. The InnovateEdu initiative, which has grown from 25 districts to over 400 in just the past year, compels edtech companies to create compatible software that can share data.

The New York-based nonprofit also has recently partnered with nearly three dozen edtech companies that have pledged to prioritize data interoperability during software development.

07/2018
Source: May 2018 Kahoot EdTrends Report for Education

The 2018 Kahoot! EdTrends Report for Educators report details various trends in edtech.

It also highlights technologies and tools that teachers are using in the classroom as well as challenges and opportunities for educators.


Link to main story: Digital school maps


Among the report's various findings, 75 percent of participants said they are seeing data-driven instruction and intervention.

An interactive school building layout next to a panoramic view of one classroom within Anaheim High School. The dotted circles indicate locations with images available while the classroom field of view is the shaded area.

Up-to-date school floor plans and detailed images can be the difference between life and death when first responders are racing against time to find a shooting suspect or to rescue survivors after a natural disaster.

Most network security problems in school districts are a result of:

Phishing. The practice of sending legitimate-seeming emails that entice users to reveal personal information or to click on links that install malicious software.

DDOS. A distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack occurs when multiple systems flood the bandwidth or resources of the district servers.

School districts will likely deal with network failures or breaches. To recover effectively, district technology professionals can respond with the following strategies.

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