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Dressing up like scarecrows in the fall and donning leprechaun hats and jackets in March is all the rage in some kindergarten classes in Indiana. It's hard to tell these students are learning the beginnings of complex math, but it's easy to see they are having fun doing it.

While the pint-sized children giggle with delight in their costumes at Fox Hill Elementary School in Indianapolis, they are learning the core basics of algebraic thinking.

With two scarecrows, they figure out how many hats the two scarecrows would wear. And with five

Dressing up like scarecrows in the fall and donning leprechaun hats and jackets in March is all the rage in some kindergarten classes in Indiana. It's hard to tell these students are learning the beginnings of complex math, but it's easy to see they are having fun doing it.

While the pint-sized children giggle with delight in their costumes at Fox Hill Elementary School in Indianapolis, they are learning the core basics of algebraic thinking.

With two scarecrows, they figure out how many hats the two scarecrows would wear. And with five

The JASON Foundation for Education

Westward, Ho! The Lewis & Clark Bicentennial in Class

Golden StateMaking Strides

California schools appear to be making progress toward federal goals for student proficiency in English and math.

A new report by the state Department of Education shows 55 percent of all schools meet adequate yearly progress targets as outlined in the No Child Left Behind Act, compared to 32 percent last year.

Results based on California's 2003 Standardized Testing and Reporting program reveal significant increases, mostly in lower grades, in the percentages of students meeting or exceeding proficiency levels.

New NAEP Results: Urban Districts Closing the Gap

Big city students are trailing their national counterparts, according to 2002 reading and writing test scores, but some results reveal pleasant surprises, officials say.

10/2003

Algebra is a gateway to better math scores on standardized tests, higher math courses, and college attendance. Several studies have now established these benefits. Yet in districts or states that do not require algebra for graduation from high school, many students never study it, including a disproportionate number of poor and minority children. They will be at a disadvantage when the new SAT is administered in March 2005: the math section will cover not only Algebra I and Geometry but some concepts from Algebra II.

While on a recent flight across the South Pacific, I pondered the challenges facing American education. Somewhere high above Guam, it hit me. What we really need is a witty leadership book replete with checklists, platitudes, alliterations and loveable characters we can all relate to. Schools are in trouble, and the job is too big for mice, fish or even Dr. Phil.

Leading 42 districts through major changes calls for unusual abilities

Understanding the educational landscape is what Rudy Castruita does best. Now serving his 10th year at the top of the San Diego County Office of Education, his particular talent suits the gargantuan dimensions that come with his job.

Student teams pull together to investigate a community health enigma--and make curricular connections in the process

When Irene Runnels landed a school Suburban in the mud on the banks of the Red River, her boss responded with a grin and shrug of his shoulders.

Disputing Your IT Advice

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