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PLANTING THE SEEDS OF STEM—Students at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute grow plants treated with fertilizer created in the school’s own aquaponic lab.

Fertilizing “floating” plants with nitrogen-rich fish feces provides real-life chemistry, biology and engineering lessons to high school students working in Baltimore Polytechnic Institute’s aquaponic laboratory.

Michael Lauro is associate executive director of the Atlantis Charter School.

There is a disconnect between what students know when they leave high school and what they are expected to know when they enter college and the workplace. So, how do you prevent this disconnect?

Social media options  for teachers and districts: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Remind/Bloomz and other private apps.

In Florida’s Collier County Public Schools, educators’ use of social media to connect with parents and the broader community started with “a coalition of the willing.”

Ken Trump (ken@schoolsecurity.org) is the president of National School Safety and Security Services.

The emotionally charged climates following the tragic attack in Parkland, Florida are understandable, but making knee-jerk decisions with a “do something, do anything, do it now” mantra can lead to high-risk, high-liability actions.

TECH PREP—Student interns, such as the young man above, develop valuable career skills handling much of the IT support at Leyden 212 High School District near Chicago.

Whether it’s a small district with just a few schools or a mammoth operation that spends billions of dollars, one thing is certain: getting tech support in the right place at the right time is mission critical.

Rose Aldubaily is director of English learners and compensatory education, and Glenn Maleyko is superintendent of Dearborn Public Schools in Michigan.

Striving to ensure the implementation of best practices that support all learners is critical to academic achievement for diverse populations.

While teacher absenteeism is sometimes unavoidable, schools across the country are following varied strategies toward higher attendance.

After February’s deadly school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, there was no shortage of suggestions for improving school security, ranging from adding more guards to arming teachers.

Doug Green has been an educator since 1970, serving as an elementary principal, district computer director, K12 science chair, high school chemistry and physics teacher, and adjunct professor.

In his book, Teaching Isn’t Rocket Science, It’s Way More Complex, Doug Green examines everything from flipped classrooms, standardized testing to special education.

Many elementary school students in Marion County Public Schools spend more than 20 minutes per night reading with family members. How did Maier and her team of educators achieve this? They eliminated homework in elementary school.

If you’ve visited a classroom lately, you’ve likely noticed a remarkable difference in how teaching and learning happens. Computers and devices are staples in most classrooms, and you’re far more likely to find students working in groups than a teacher at the front of the room lecturing. Though the teacher continues to play a crucial role, how they do that has changed. Today’s teachers play more of a mentor role, facilitating and supporting students on their personal learning journeys; pushing them to discover and discuss, explore and experiment, and to fail fast and adapt.

The New School Rules is a book about pursuing education reform. It describes effective ways to build team trust and to lead faculty without micromanaging.

The New School Rules, a book about pursuing education reform, describes effective ways to build team trust and to lead faculty without micromanaging.

Math instruction continues to move further into digital territory, but many lessons still depend on hands-on activities and nondigital materials, such as textbooks.

What issues do your K-12 visitor management system clients want to address?

“Surprisingly, there are more tardies/early dismissals and staff check-ins than visitors in most schools. For example, in 2017, in 4,500 user schools, the Ident-A-Kid system logged an average of 2,020 tardies/early releases and 1,830 staff check-ins per year, per school, and only 960 visitors. Based on the sheer numbers, the impacts to funding and the requirement for accurate tracking, schools and districts are particularly interested in tardy and early dismissal management.”

Margaret Petkiewicz says the adoption of Common Core State Standards in California created a need for a support program for teachers in kindergarten through second grade who instruct in Spanish for the San José Unified School District. 

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