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Curriculum Roundup

Today’s most progressive language instruction covers more than speech. Educators now work to build students’ fluency in the culture behind the words.

Four resources for including diverse voices in history and social studies.

To increase diversity in the social studies curriculum, the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) recommends these strategies.

The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and the National Council for the Social Studies will be holding annual conferences this fall.

According to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, these core practices help grow globally competent students.

Perhaps one of the more confusing aspects of teaching about religion is the question of whether students can pray in public schools.

The answer is yes, within established guidelines.

According to the American Civil Liberties Union:


Link to main story: Schools are teaching, not preaching

With U.S. businesses of all sizes competing on the global stage, foreign language classes—and the teachers who teach them—are vanishing from K12 schools.

Only about 10 percent of the U.S. population speaks a language other than English proficiently, and just 15 percent of public elementary schools offer language instruction, according to The American Academy of Arts and Science.

Curious to know what you can and cannot teach in a religious studies class in primary, middle, and secondary schools?

You can find a few resources below.

The First Amendment Center offers an extensive collection of papers, books and other materials for educators to know what they can and cannot do, by law, in public schools.