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The zero-out-of-100 is just one of the traditional grading practices schools are rethinking as they seek to report student performance more accurately.

Dyslexia is not correlated with intelligence, says Richard Wagner, associate director of the Florida Center for Reading Research and a professor of psychology at Florida State University.

“If you’re reading at a level at which you do everything else, it’s probably not dyslexia,” Wagner says.

“If you’re reading below the level at which you do other things, it’s more likely to be dyslexia.”

Educators know that most dyslexic students will need interventions and accommodations throughout school, but best practices continue to evolve as more is learned about this reading disability.

Many states have enacted laws and guidelines spelling out how schools can help students with dyslexia.

Such laws vary by state.

According to understood.org, a website on learning and attention issues founded by 15 nonprofit organizations, they generally address issues such as:


Link to main story: How schools are disrupting dyslexia

Administrators who don’t feel their staffs have the time to manage community programs have contracted with outside groups to organize and oversee services.

Communities in Schools, which partners with about 400 districts in 25 states, has been helping administrators provide non-academic supports to students in high-need schools for about 40 years, says Gary Chapman, the nonprofit’s executive vice president for business development.

At four elementary schools in Idaho’s Boise School District, families in need can go to specially designated community rooms to pick up food, clothing and other necessities.

Schools connected to overseas U.S. military bases often try to restrict class sizes—to about 18 or 20 pupils—so teachers can develop closer relationships with their students.

A teacher’s primary obligation is to make sure newcomers integrate into their classes as quickly as possible, says Amy Peaceman, who recently retired after 41 years of teaching in Department of Defense schools.

Military-connected students—compared to civilian classmates—have moderately elevated rates of just about all risk factors, including suicidal thoughts, substance abuse and bullying.

Vocational education used to be considered low-tech and non-academic. Career and technical education now requires nearly as much ELA and math as any other degree.

Superintendent Curtis Cain, whose students in the Wentzville School District in Missouri follow the Project Lead the Way curriculum, have brought CTE education to life through projects such as creating a customized sensory cane for a fellow student.

And students in a biomedical course developed a “Zacket” for a classmate with mobility issues.

It’s a jacket that can easily be worn over the wheelchair.

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