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Feature for District CIO

Most network security problems in school districts are a result of:

Phishing. The practice of sending legitimate-seeming emails that entice users to reveal personal information or to click on links that install malicious software.

DDOS. A distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack occurs when multiple systems flood the bandwidth or resources of the district servers.

School districts will likely deal with network failures or breaches. To recover effectively, district technology professionals can respond with the following strategies.

3D printers have become necessary devices in classrooms in all subjects. Students who have mastered this technology are in high demand in a wide range of professions.(Gettyimages.com: monkeybusinessimages).

From kindergarten to senior year, from basic problem-solving to career prep, 3D printers have become instructional backbones coast to coast.

PROOF OF PURCHASE—Educators at Dysart USD must justify the learning value of all technology purchases, such as the laptop (above) being used by a student at Sonoran Heights Elementary School.

Administrators now strive to align strong technology plans with district strategic goals.

TECH PREP—Student interns, such as the young man above, develop valuable career skills handling much of the IT support at Leyden 212 High School District near Chicago.

Whether it’s a small district with just a few schools or a mammoth operation that spends billions of dollars, one thing is certain: getting tech support in the right place at the right time is mission critical.

BROADENING HORIZONS—Tech staff at Burnsville-Eagan-Savage School District near Minneapolis coach teachers to help students use technology to bridge cultural barriers.

Instructional technology directors serve as classroom coaches and content experts in districts determined to use devices, digital learning and other technology to their full instructional potential.

Steven Langford,  CIO, Beaverton School District (Ore.)

Here are five crucial decisions to make in developing best practices for the wide variety of internet filters—and your options for using them—in K12 schools.

For most school districts, internet filters are crucial for complying with the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA), which requires restricting students from accessing inappropriate online content.

Filtering also allows districts to manage limited bandwidth.

Below are a list of internet filtering providers:


Link to main story: Digital gatekeepers for K12


Blocksi, blocksi.net

Crafting a strong and well-balanced social media policy requires considerable time and effort. The policy must be flexible enough to accommodate new tech trends yet thorough and specific.

ACADEMIC EFFICIENCY—Los Angeles USD’s CIO, Shahryar Khazei, has integrated enterprise resource planning software (which streamlines administrative functions) with the district’s student information system.

Some early adopters in K12 education have deployed ERP to manage a range of operations more efficiently.

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