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AI will also have a big impact on network and data security.

The best way to keep a school’s computers free of malware while securing student and teacher identities is to use a layered approach powered by artificial intelligence in the cloud.

Just about every antivirus program has three overlapping defenses:


Link to main story: AI accelerates in K12


Rose Luckin is the chair of learning with digital technologies at University College London’s Knowledge Lab.

Until recently, the quality of classroom instruction relied almost entirely on a teacher’s resourcefulness, motivation and intelligence. Soon, it will also depend on artificial intelligence.

Growing mental health needs of students ranked as one of the major issues facing educators who participated in DA’s 2018 Outlook Survey.

A look back at the year’s top stories sheds some light on the way forward.

Clockwise from top left: Brian Eschbacher, Brisa Ayub, Theresa Morris, Jennifer Abrams, Kirk Langer, Kate Walsh, Rene Islas, Tamara Fyke, Amy Klinger, Matthew Emerson

What should happen and what will happen in various areas of education over the next few years elicits different answers from educators and from other experts.

New Product Showcase brings together the latest innovative products and service solutions in K12 education in one easy-to-use reference section.

The zero-out-of-100 is just one of the traditional grading practices schools are rethinking as they seek to report student performance more accurately.

Dyslexia is not correlated with intelligence, says Richard Wagner, associate director of the Florida Center for Reading Research and a professor of psychology at Florida State University.

“If you’re reading at a level at which you do everything else, it’s probably not dyslexia,” Wagner says.

“If you’re reading below the level at which you do other things, it’s more likely to be dyslexia.”

Educators know that most dyslexic students will need interventions and accommodations throughout school, but best practices continue to evolve as more is learned about this reading disability.

Many states have enacted laws and guidelines spelling out how schools can help students with dyslexia.

Such laws vary by state.

According to understood.org, a website on learning and attention issues founded by 15 nonprofit organizations, they generally address issues such as:


Link to main story: How schools are disrupting dyslexia

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