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School administrators more closely assess the social-emotional strengths of students and the impact of new programs.

Questions from three leading assessments.

How can district leaders guarantee that they will get accurate and actionable results from SEL assessments? What are the biggest challenges?

A February 2015 study from the Center for Benefit-Cost Studies of Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, concluded that, on average, every dollar invested in SEL programming yields $11 in long-term benefits.

With the manufacturing industry increasingly seeking workers with more advanced tech skills, high school career and technical education programs now focus heavily on robotics, unmanned aviation technology and mechatronics to help students jump-start potentially lucrative careers.

FUTURES TAKE FLIGHT—CTE students at Duval High School in Maryland will soon be able to obtain their drone pilot’s license before they graduate.

How three high schools are implementing CTE programs to help students succeed in high-tech careers.

A Duval High School CTE student uses music and dance to teach the principles of flight.

A student’s name and identity matters. That’s why educators are spending more time on name pronunciation and are even making it part of the curriculum.

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, you may be making your students, staff and parents feel excluded. If you answered “no” to each, you’re taking a great approach.

Educators and administrators should ask themselves these questions to determine whether they’re respecting identities and cultures by learning students’ and staff members’ names.  

Additional information about a software solution to name pronunciation.

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