You are here

Feature

Schools in Washington, including Marysville-Pilchuck School District, are required to educate students about the culture and history of the state’s indigenous nations.

Despite recent controversies, most K12 U.S. history textbooks now devote more space to viewpoints outside of the white-European male narrative, historians say.

“The whole approach to historiography has changed,” says Luess Sampson-Lizotte, vice president of humanities & science product development at Pearson. “It is a little broader and more inclusive of multiple perspectives of the American story.”

ool Nurses, holds the inhalant form of Narcan, the emergency antidote that can revive students after a heroin overdose.

The number of districts and states rushing to stock an emergency antidote that can revive students suffering heroin overdoses shows the severe degree to which the nation’s latest drug epidemic has disrupted schools.

 Superintendent Barbara P. Canavan of Harford County Schools in Maryland speaks during a recent student summit on drug abuse. Among a range of other initiatives, the district shares data about the number of students who never use drugs in an effort to discourage others from becoming addicted.

Prevent people from starting heroin

  • Reduce prescription opioid painkiller abuse.
  • Improve opioid painkiller prescribing practices and identify high-risk individuals early. 

Reduce heroin addiction

  • Ensure access to Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT).
  • Treat people addicted to heroin or prescription opioid painkillers with MAT, which combines the use of medications (methadone, buprenorphine or naltrexone) with counseling and behavioral therapies. 

Reverse heroin overdose

    Forced to make grade reconfigurations, Island Trees School District in New York created Michael Stokes Elementary School, for grades 2 through 4, above, out of a K4 elementary school building to save money and to use staff more efficiently.

    School leaders nationwide are exploring innovative group-level groupings and thinking beyond the typical K5 elementary school, grades 6 through 8 middle school and grades 9 through 12 high school model to figure out how to continue to deliver appropriate education with fewer funds.

    • The Duval County School Board reconceived six schools to focus on early learning, autism, arts, military leadership and advanced studies.

    Last summer, Superintendent Nikolai Vitti spearheaded the program and boundary changes to improve low performance and offer stronger educational options to attract students back to traditional public schools.

    School’s certainly in session for canines throughout the nation: Therapy dogs, security dogs, and service dogs walk the halls alongside students in many schools. Here is a look at five more districts that have welcomed canines into classrooms in recent years.

    Students from Minford High School in Ohio visit with therapy dog Bella after a fellow student was killed.

    Here are some tips from Jen VonLintel, of School Therapy Dogs: 

    Find studies that show benefits. A binder of research and examples of dogs working in schools can be key to gaining the support of top administrators and/or the school board. Include insurance documents, training data, vet certificates and reports on progress made by students who have worked with therapy dogs.   

    The Upsala Area School District in Minnesota created incentives that have enticed teachers like Heather Johnson, from Upsala Elementary School, to retire when the school year ends.

    For many districts, early retirement incentives are considered a good business practice—a way to cut top-heavy payrolls and replace teachers whose heart may no longer be in the classroom. But without good planning, these incentives can have unintended financial and academic costs. 

    Collaborations between businesses and districts run deeper than internships. Business representatives help districts create curriculum and train teachers. They also volunteer as coaches and mentors to help students gain college and career readiness skills.

    In many partnerships that bring businesses and schools together, a private or nonprofit third party serves as a bridge to the most successful collaborations.

    For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology (FIRST) offers extracurricular STEM activities, including an international high school robotics competition, to more than 400,000 K12 students nationwide, with mostly school-based robotics or younger LEGO League teams in 86 countries.

    Pages