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Growing mental health needs of students ranked as one of the major issues facing educators who participated in DA’s 2018 Outlook Survey.

A look back at the year’s top stories sheds some light on the way forward.

Clockwise from top left: Brian Eschbacher, Brisa Ayub, Theresa Morris, Jennifer Abrams, Kirk Langer, Kate Walsh, Rene Islas, Tamara Fyke, Amy Klinger, Matthew Emerson

What should happen and what will happen in various areas of education over the next few years elicits different answers from educators and from other experts.

New Product Showcase brings together the latest innovative products and service solutions in K12 education in one easy-to-use reference section.

The zero-out-of-100 is just one of the traditional grading practices schools are rethinking as they seek to report student performance more accurately.

Educators know that most dyslexic students will need interventions and accommodations throughout school, but best practices continue to evolve as more is learned about this reading disability.

Dyslexia is not correlated with intelligence, says Richard Wagner, associate director of the Florida Center for Reading Research and a professor of psychology at Florida State University.

“If you’re reading at a level at which you do everything else, it’s probably not dyslexia,” Wagner says.

“If you’re reading below the level at which you do other things, it’s more likely to be dyslexia.”

Many states have enacted laws and guidelines spelling out how schools can help students with dyslexia.

Such laws vary by state.

According to understood.org, a website on learning and attention issues founded by 15 nonprofit organizations, they generally address issues such as:


Link to main story: How schools are disrupting dyslexia

At four elementary schools in Idaho’s Boise School District, families in need can go to specially designated community rooms to pick up food, clothing and other necessities.

Administrators who don’t feel their staffs have the time to manage community programs have contracted with outside groups to organize and oversee services.

Communities in Schools, which partners with about 400 districts in 25 states, has been helping administrators provide non-academic supports to students in high-need schools for about 40 years, says Gary Chapman, the nonprofit’s executive vice president for business development.

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