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Mounds of research has shown that principals’ most important contributions to their schools come in the realm of instructional leadership.

Here’s how schools and districts overcome six potential pitfalls after adopting self-paced learning.

LEANER & GREENER—An MIT supercomputer remapped bus routes for Boston Public Schools (above). The district trimmed its fleet by 50 vehicles, saved about $4 million and cut carbon dioxide emissions.

The techniques for streamlining bus transportation range from a variety of off-the shelf routing programs to relying more on an administrator’s experience with local conditions.

There’s no shortage of programs that can help make your district’s busing routes more efficient.

The best part is that you don’t need a supercomputer to use them.

BusBoss Professional


Link to main story: Schools pursue better directions

Turning right on a red light is part of the driving landscape in all 50 states, but school buses generally wait for green.

Many states prohibit a right turn on red for a school bus, but Florida’s Manatee County just started a pilot program that lets drivers of the district’s 150 buses go right on red, potentially saving 10 to 20 minutes per route.

While this one change might cut valuable minutes off a bus route, in some places it’s not as simple as it sounds.

the best medicine—A “laughter yoga” session reduces student stress in the West Windsor-Plainsboro Regional School District in New Jersey. The district has also provided PD to show teachers how to conduct meditation and breathing exercises to ease their own and students’ anxiety.

Across the country, districts are grappling with rising levels of student anxiety attributed to everything from academic pressures to larger social forces. 

Educators and psychologists propose a host of explanations for the apparent uptick in student anxiety. Some point to public events – terrorism, school shootings, opioid addiction, the coarsening of political discourse in the age of Trump.

Others blame technology—devices that substitute electronic contact for face-to-face interaction, and social media that transform school-hours drama into a 24-7 preoccupation.

Still others look to family dysfunction, or pressure to match parental achievements. “The anxiety comes from so many different sources.

Source: U.S. Department of Energy / Source: Orlando Utilities Commission

Faced with tight budgets and the expanding use of electricity-hungry technology, districts are turning to energy efficiency solutions that don’t sacrifice learning power.

What issues do your K-12 visitor management system clients want to address?

“Surprisingly, there are more tardies/early dismissals and staff check-ins than visitors in most schools. For example, in 2017, in 4,500 user schools, the Ident-A-Kid system logged an average of 2,020 tardies/early releases and 1,830 staff check-ins per year, per school, and only 960 visitors. Based on the sheer numbers, the impacts to funding and the requirement for accurate tracking, schools and districts are particularly interested in tardy and early dismissal management.”

Today’s more sophisticated visitor management systems allow K12 leaders to get a better handle on who’s trying to enter (or leave) their buildings—including tardy students.

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