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Here’s a look at how administrators and their teams are redesigning libraries.

Digital library content spans fiction, nonfiction, test prep, professional development materials and more.

Overdrive’s catalog has 4 million ebooks, audiobooks and videos, and is used by 17,000 schools worldwide, says David Burleigh, the company’s director of brand.

Schools pick which titles they want access to, how many copies they want and for how long to lend them. Groups of schools can sign up together to share access.

CONTENT CHECK—Jodi Ide, a teacher at Brighton High School in Utah,  says  parents have never complained about  the content in her world religion class—and no students have ever changed faiths. (Deseret News / Laura Seitz).

Teaching about religion is not only permissible, but is gaining traction as a way to promote greater understanding in a world of conflicting dogmas.

Lockdown drills can pose health hazards, says Dennis Lewis, president of Edu-Safe, a safety training firm.

Lewis, who spent 17 years as the public safety director for Springfield Public Schools in Missouri, shares the following best practices:

Connect instruction to safety. Rigid, step-by-step drills don’t encourage critical thinking, discussion or variations. Educators can develop lessons that, for example, encourage students to think about wider safety issues and teamwork.

Teachers today have more control over how and when they receive professional development.

Here are five strategies that school administrators are adopting to support the rising demand for special education.

Teachers across the country are creating their own more sophisticated formative assessments and using adaptive learning software to generate real-time information on how each of their students are performing.

In New York, an aggressive opt-out movement—wherein about 60 percent of third- through eighth-graders skipped high-stakes tests—has forced many districts to rethink their assessment methods.

Wealthy schools can raise eye-popping amounts from fundraising that add to the opportunities for well-off students, while the neediest schools struggle to keep up.

OFFERING INSIGHT—Students at Saint Louis Public Schools work on tablets. The district is using technology to share student academic and behavioral data with parents in real-time.

More than a decade after Response-to-Intervention and Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) took root on school campuses across the country, multi-tier strategies have become the standard for identifying and assisting struggling students.

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