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Deborah C. Hoard is the producer and director of Re:Thinking, a new documentary that inspires educators, politicians and the public to reimagine schools.

What if we taught kids how to think, not what to think? That question is the focus of Re:Thinking, a new documentary that inspires educators, politicians and the public to reimagine schools.

Beverly Daniel Tatum is an authority on the psychology of racism and a retired president of Spelman College.

20 years after Beverly Daniel Tatum's landmark 1997 book Why Are All The Black Kids Sitting Together In The Cafeteria? was released, she is now back with a fully revised edition.

Linda Cliatt-Wayman was assistant superintendent for all the high schools in Philadelphia before taking the role of principal at the notorious Strawberry Mansion High School.

As the principal who changed two low-performing and violent Philadelphia high schools into safe spaces focused on learning, Linda Cliatt-Wayman developed a program of high expectations.

Trish Rubin, former educator and now marketing consultant, wrote BrandED: Tell Your Story, Build Relationships and Empower Learning.

Trish Rubin, former educator and now marketing consultant, provides a step-by-step framework to the nuances of spreading good school news and winning support in her book.

At Hamilton Southeastern School District, Michael Beresford is assistant superintendent of staff and student services and Brooke Lawson is district mental health coordinator.

District Mental Health Coordinator Brooke Lawson and Assistant Superintendent of Staff and Student Services Michael Beresford discuss the challenges of addressing mental health issues.

Janet Poppendieck is a nationally recognized scholar and activist. She is the author of Free for All: Fixing School Food in America (University of California Press, 2010).

Janet Poppendieck, author of Free for All: Fixing School Food in America, says more must be done to end stigmatizing students who receive free lunches in school because it’s not a problem that will change anytime soon.

David Krulwich is a principal of the Urban Assembly School for Applied Math and Science, a college preparatory school serving grades 6 through 12 in the Bronx.

David Krulwich, principal of the Urban Assembly School for Applied Math and Science, says new teachers are too often left to fend for themselves, without the benefit of an artisan-apprentice relationship.

Paul Tough offers practical steps that adults can take to improve students’ chances for a positive future in his book Helping Children Succeed: What Works and Why (2016, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt).

In his previous book, How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity and the Hidden Power of Character, journalist Paul Tough looked at how non-cognitive personal qualities like perseverance, self-control and conscientiousness play a critical role in children’s success.

Lou Pepe directed the film The Bad Kids, which looks at how the teachers and staff at Black Rock High School confront crippling generational poverty, and create small victories for the students who have often lost any sense of hope for their future.

Black Rock High School, remotely situated in California’s Mojave Desert, serves a population of students who are often struggling academically and living in households with poverty, drug use and neglect. 

Mark Seidenberg is trained in psychology, linguistics and neuroscience, and has used his education to study reading—language—as part of human behavior. He's also a researcher, who studies reading, and a professor.

In his new book Language at the Speed of Sight: How We Read, Why So Many Can’t, and What Can Be Done About It (Basic Books, 2017), Seidenberg says the answer to the question “Why can’t Johnny read?” stems from how reading is taught.

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