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DA Daily

LMS enhances K12 instruction

Widespread use of digital learning materials, an intensifying focus on achievement and the influx of digital devices into classrooms are increasing districts’ need to have some form of learning management systems (LMS), experts say.

Local school priorities trump national assessments

The advent of national assessments, though developed with noble intent, has the potential to subvert the ability of local districts to retain their unique character. Formative data derived from teachers who know their students well and who understand local priorities is one of the best ways to assess learning outcomes.

Business of workers’ comp in education

A “culture of safety”—at all levels of a district—is the first and most critical step in dealing with occupational injury. It also guides the prevention of, response to and mitigation of hazards in the workplace, including staff behavior.

Ending the edtech backlog

When your job is to manage the IT infrastructure for more than 83,000 students, across 150 schools, who use more than 340 different pieces of education software, it would not be too surprising to be singing the blues. But in Music City—Nashville—our district is singing up-tempo as we enter year two of a sweeping technology initiative.

Apps open next frontier for teacher PD

A new wave of apps connects teachers with mobile access to professional development and expands opportunities for collaboration with mentors and peers. Some apps allow teachers to videotape themselves to get instant feedback from mentors while others connect districts virtually with education consultants.

An education guidebook for inquiring minds

In his book A More Beautiful Question, Warren Berger says the art of inquiry is the foundation of advancements in science, medicine, mathematics and more. Yet, in our schools—the one place that should emphasize questioning—we value rote answers to standardized tests over challenging inquiry.

How schools can even playing field for girls of color

Schools with high minority populations not only have fewer resources for athletics, but the number of sports offered and the chance to play are even further limited for girls of color.

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